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Here's a morning challenge: you have a table with rows like this:

=> select * from candidates;
 id |   name   
----+----------
  1 | JOhn Doe
  2 | Melinda
  3 | Bill
  4 | Jane
(4 rows)

=> select * from evaluation order by id;
 id | score |                reason                
----+-------+--------------------------------------
  1 | RED   | Clueless!
  1 | AMBER | Came in dirty jeans
  2 | GREEN | Competenet and experienced
  2 | AMBER | Was chewing a gum
  3 | AMBER | No experience in the industry sector
  3 | AMBER | Has knowledge gaps
(6 rows)

John has a red, Melinda has a green and amber, Bill has just ambers while Jane hasn't been interviewed yet.

Your mission, should you choose to accept it is to generate a query that displays the results for Boss' approval. Boss likes to have results presented as:

  • If a candidate has a GREEN, then display just greens and ignore reds and ambers.
  • If candidate has reds and ambers or just ambers then display all of them, but have red score appear first so he can skip ambers if RED is really bad.
  • display GREY for all candidates that have not been yet interviewed ('Jane')

Rules of the game:

  • No functions! Must be a single SQL query (however many sub-queries you want)
  • Any SQL variant accepted, but ANSI SQL 92 or later gets you more points
  • Try to avoid inline variables if you can (@foo in MySQL)

My own answer turned out to be in line with group-think:

SELECT *
FROM   evaluation e1
       NATURAL JOIN candidates
WHERE  score = 'GREEN'
        OR ( score IN ( 'RED', 'AMBER' )
             AND NOT EXISTS (SELECT 1
                             FROM   evaluation e2
                             WHERE  e1.id = e2.id
                                    AND score = 'GREEN') )
UNION
SELECT id,
       'GREY'              AS score,
       'Not yet evaluated' AS reason,
       name
FROM   candidates
WHERE  id NOT IN (SELECT id
                  FROM   evaluation)
ORDER  BY 1,
          2 DESC  
share|improve this question
    
Constraints such as no functions and avoiding inline variables will cause solutions to avoid encapsulation of code, and introduct poor practices / anti-patterns. Also, why SQL-92? There have been many revisions since, and no platform is fully compatible with SQL-92 or any of ther other standards any way. –  MatBailie Sep 6 '11 at 9:42
    
No functions to make it a challenge, and SQL-92 or later to have it more or less portable - not using very platform specific stuff. Play along nonetheless! –  Konrads Sep 6 '11 at 9:55
    
Are you asking us to do your homework for you? –  Ollie Sep 6 '11 at 9:55
1  
Is this a real question? Or just a game? I'll let others play games, and save my time and effort for something constructive. Sorry. (If it's real, what purpose do the constraints serve? And what is the reality of the platforms you are/maybe using? Some platofmrs have platform specific functionallity that would help you significantly.) –  MatBailie Sep 6 '11 at 9:56
1  
@martin-smith all posted! –  Konrads Sep 6 '11 at 16:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The following is transitional SQL-92:

SELECT c.name, e.*
  FROM candidates AS c
       JOIN (
             SELECT *
               FROM evaluation
              WHERE score = 'GREEN'
             UNION
             SELECT *
               FROM evaluation AS e1
              WHERE score IN ('AMBER', 'RED')
                    AND NOT EXISTS (
                                    SELECT * 
                                      FROM evaluation AS e2
                                     WHERE e2.id = e1.id
                                           AND e2.score = 'GREEN'
                                   )                                    
            ) AS e 
          ON c.id = e.id
UNION
SELECT c.name, c.id, 'GREY', '(not interviewed)'
  FROM candidates AS c
 WHERE NOT EXISTS (
                   SELECT *
                     FROM evaluation AS e 
                    WHERE e.id = c.id
                   )
ORDER BY id, score DESC;

Alternate (Intermediate SQL-92):

SELECT c.name, e.id, e.score, e.reason 
  FROM candidates AS c
       JOIN (
             SELECT *
               FROM evaluation
             EXCEPT
             SELECT *
               FROM evaluation
              WHERE score IN ('AMBER', 'RED')
                    AND id IN ( SELECT id FROM evaluation WHERE score = 'GREEN' )
            ) AS e 
          ON c.id = e.id
UNION
SELECT name, id, 'GREY' AS score, '(not interviewed)' AS reason
  FROM candidates
 WHERE id NOT IN ( SELECT id FROM evaluation )
ORDER BY id, score DESC;
share|improve this answer
    
Well done! Passes muster and is Transitional SQL-92! –  Konrads Sep 6 '11 at 10:15
    
I also tried to use relational operators (avoiding OUTER JOIN and instead using NOT EXISTS for semidifference, for example) to make it portable to other non-SQL relational DBMSs, noting that display order is non-relational ;) –  onedaywhen Sep 6 '11 at 10:28
SELECT
        c.id                       AS id
      , c.name                     AS name
      , COALESCE(e.score, 'GREY')  AS score
      , e.reason                   AS reason
FROM 
        candidates    c
    LEFT JOIN
        evaluation    e
            ON e.id = c.id
WHERE
        e.score = 'GREEN'
    OR
        NOT EXISTS
          ( SELECT *
            FROM evaluation    ee
            WHERE ee.id = c.id
              AND ee.score = 'GREEN'
          )
ORDER BY
        id      ASC
      , score   DESC 
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 The Mimer SQL-92 Validator says yours is intermediate SQL-92 but I had thought table correlation names in the ORDER BY would violate; I had to remove them to get yours to work in SQL Server and it still validates as intermediate SQL-92 on Mimer. –  onedaywhen Sep 6 '11 at 10:13
    
Well done! on PostgreSQL the c.score in order by must be replaced with just 'score' –  Konrads Sep 6 '11 at 10:16
    
If it fails on SQL Server and PostgreSQL I'm suspecting the Mimer validator is wrong and that for SQL-92 compliance you should change ORDER BY c.id ASC, c.score DESC to ORDER BY id ASC, score DESC; i.e. lose the table correlation name c in the ORDER BY clause. –  onedaywhen Sep 6 '11 at 10:32
    
Yes, corrected. That's why it's not good to have aliases same as column names. –  ypercube Sep 6 '11 at 10:42
           SELECT c.id,
               c.name,
               nvl(e.score, 'GREY'),
               nvl(e.reason, 'Not yet interviewed')
          FROM candidates c, evaluation e
         where c.id = e.id(+)
           and ((e.score = 'GREEN') or
               (e.score in ('RED', 'AMBER') and not exists
                (select null
                    from evaluation e2
                   where e2.id = e.id
                     and e2.score = 'GREEN')) or e.score is null)
         order by c.id, e.score desc;
share|improve this answer
    
Welcome on SO, here, it is a good practice to explain why to use your solution and not just how. That will make your answer more valuable and help further reader to have a better understanding of how you do it. I also suggest that you have a look on our FAQ : stackoverflow.com/faq. –  ForceMagic Oct 26 '12 at 5:40
SELECT A.ID
    , A.NAME
    , B.SCORE
    , B.REASON
FROM CANDIDATES A
LEFT JOIN EVALUATION B
    ON A.ID = B.ID
WHERE B.SCORE = 'GREEN'
UNION
SELECT A.ID
    , A.NAME
    , COALESCE(B.SCORE,'GREY')
    , B.REASON
FROM CANDIDATES A
LEFT JOIN EVALUATION B
    ON A.ID = B.ID
WHERE A.ID NOT IN (SELECT ID FROM EVALUATION WHERE SCORE = 'GREEN')
ORDER BY ID, SCORE DESC;
share|improve this answer
    
First select all the ID having score = green and then select the rest of the ids excluding the id's having score = green. –  sarab27 May 27 '13 at 16:30
    
Don't use comments to explain your own answers. If you need to describe it, use post editing. –  SysGen May 27 '13 at 16:52

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