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A question I got on my last interview:

Design a function f, such that:

f(f(n)) == -n

Where n is a 32 bit signed integer; you can't use complex numbers arithmetic.

If you can't design such a function for the whole range of numbers, design it for the largest range possible.

Any ideas?

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73  
+1: Nothing wrong with this question, not sure why it was downvoted or has close votes. –  Juliet Apr 8 '09 at 21:13
51  
Apparently there are people who think that maths is not programming related. –  Tamas Czinege Apr 8 '09 at 21:14
39  
Or offensive? Does that button mean "I can't figure it out" now? –  1800 INFORMATION Apr 8 '09 at 21:14
149  
public int f(int n) { throw new NotImplementException("You get the rest of the code when you give me a job."); } –  Juliet Apr 8 '09 at 21:21
238  
What a terrible interview question. –  Daniel Daranas Apr 9 '09 at 9:40

117 Answers 117

Easy, just make f return something that appears to equal any integer, and is convertable from an integer.

public class Agreeable
{
    public static bool operator==(Agreeable c, int n)
        { return true; }

    public static bool operator!=(Agreeable c, int n)
        { return false; }

    public static implicit operator Agreeable(int n)
        { return new Agreeable(); }
}

class Program
{
    public static Agreeable f(Agreeable c)
        { return c; }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Debug.Assert(f(f(0)) == 0);
        Debug.Assert(f(f(5)) == -5);
        Debug.Assert(f(f(-5)) == 5);
        Debug.Assert(f(f(int.MaxValue)) == -int.MaxValue);
    }
}
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One way to create many solutions is to notice that if we have a partition of the integers into two sets S and R s.t -S=S, -R=R, and a function g s.t g(R) = S

then we can create f as follows:

if x is in R then f(x) = g(x)

if x is in S then f(x) = -invg(x)

where invg(g(x))=x so invg is the inverse function for g.

The first solution mentioned above is the partition R=even numbers, R= odd numbers, g(x)=x+1.

We could take any two infinite sets T,P s.t T+U= the set of integers and take S=T+(-T), R=U+(-U).

Then -S=S and -R=R by their definitions and we can take g to be any 1-1 correspondence from S to R, which must exist since both sets are infinite and countable, will work.

So this will give us many solutions however not all of course could be programmed as they would not be finitely defined.

An example of one that can be is:

R= numbers divisible by 3 and S= numbers not divisible by 3.

Then we take g(6r) = 3r+1, g(6r+3) = 3r+2.

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Really, these questions are more about seeing the interviewer wrestle with the spec, and the design, error handling, boundary cases and the choice of suitable environment for the solution, etc, more than they are about the actual solution. However: :)

The function here is written around the closed 4 cycle idea. If the function f is only permitted to land only on signed 32bit integers, then the various solutions above will all work except for three of the input range numbers as others have pointed out. minint will never satisfy the functional equation, so we'll raise an exception if that is an input.

Here I am permitting my Python function to operate on and return either tuples or integers. The task spec admits this, it only specifies that two applications of the function should return an object equal to the original object if it is an int32. (I would be asking for more detail about the spec.)

This allows my orbits to be nice and symmetrical, and to cover all of the input integers (except minint). I originally envisaged the cycle to visit half integer values, but I didn't want to get tangled up with rounding errors. Hence the tuple representation. Which is a way of sneaking complex rotations in as tuples, without using the complex arithmetic machinery.

Note that no state needs to be preserved between invocations, but the caller does need to allow the return value to be either a tuple or an int.

def f(x) :
  if isinstance(x, tuple) :
      # return a number.
      if x[0] != 0 :
        raise ValueError  # make sure the tuple is well formed.
      else :
        return ( -x[1] )

  elif isinstance(x, int ) :
    if x == int(-2**31 ):
      # This value won't satisfy the functional relation in
      # signed 2s complement 32 bit integers.
      raise ValueError
    else :
      # send this integer to a tuple (representing ix)
      return( (0,x) )
  else :
    # not an int or a tuple
    raise TypeError

So applying f to 37 twice gives -37, and vice versa:

>>> x = 37
>>> x = f(x)
>>> x
(0, 37)
>>> x = f(x)
>>> x
-37
>>> x = f(x)
>>> x
(0, -37)
>>> x = f(x)
>>> x
37

Applying f twice to zero gives zero:

>>> x=0
>>> x = f(x)
>>> x
(0, 0)
>>> x = f(x)
>>> x
0

And we handle the one case for which the problem has no solution (in int32):

>>> x = int( -2**31 )
>>> x = f(x)

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#110>", line 1, in <module>
    x = f(x)
  File "<pyshell#33>", line 13, in f
    raise ValueError
ValueError

If you think the function breaks the "no complex arithmetic" rule by mimicking the 90 degree rotations of multiplying by i, we can change that by distorting the rotations. Here the tuples represent half integers, not complex numbers. If you trace the orbits on a number line, you will get nonintersecting loops that satisfy the given functional relation.

f2: n -> (2 abs(n) +1, 2 sign( n) ) if n is int32, and not minint.
f2: (x, y) -> sign(y) * (x-1) /2  (provided y is \pm 2 and x is not more than 2maxint+1

Exercise: implement this f2 by modifying f. And there are other solutions, e.g. have the intermediate landing points be rational numbers other than half integers. There's a fraction module that might prove useful. You'll need a sign function.

This exercise has really nailed for me the delights of a dynamically typed language. I can't see a solution like this in C.

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const unsigned long Magic = 0x8000000;

unsigned long f(unsigned long n)
{    
    if(n > Magic )
    {
        return Magic - n;
    }

    return n + Magic;
}

0~2^31

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What about following:

int f (int n)
{
    static bool pass = false;
    pass = !pass;
    return pass? n : -n;
}
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2  
Not thread safe :P –  Jem Jun 11 '09 at 16:09

This will work for the range -1073741823 to 1073741822:

int F(int n)
{
	if(n < 0)
	{
		if(n > -1073741824)
			n = -1073741824 + n;
		else n = -(n + 1073741824);
	}
	else
	{
		if(n < 1073741823)
			n = 1073741823 + n;
		else n = -(n - 1073741823);
	}
	return n;
}

It works by taking the available range of a 32 bit signed int and dividing it in two. The first iteration of the function places n outside of that range by itself. The second iteration checks if it is outside this range - if so then it puts it back within the range but makes it negative.

It is effectively a way of keeping an extra "bit" of info about the value n.

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void f(int x)
{
     Console.WriteLine(string.Format("f(f({0})) == -{0}",x));
}

Sorry guys... it was too tempting ;)

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C++ solution;

long long f(int n){return static_cast <long long> (n);}
int f(long long n){return -static_cast <int> (n);}

int n = 777;
assert(f(f(n)) == -n);
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Another cheating solution. We use a language that allows operator overloading. Then we have f(x) return something that has overloaded == to always return true. This seems compatible with the problem description, but obviously goes against the spirit of the puzzle.

Ruby example:

class Cheat
  def ==(n)
     true
  end
end

def f(n)
  Cheat.new
end

Which gives us:

>> f(f(1)) == -1
=> true

but also (not too surprising)

>> f(f(1)) == "hello world"
=> true
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Some were similar but just thought I would write down my first idea (in C++)

#include <vector>

vector<int>* f(int n)
{
  returnVector = new vector<int>();
  returnVector->push_back(n);
  return returnVector;
}

int f(vector<int>* n) { return -(n->at(0)); }

Just using overloading to cause f(f(n)) to actually call two different functions

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JavaScript one-liner:

function f(n) { return ((f.f = !f.f) * 2 - 1) * n; }
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Another way is to keep the state in one bit and flip it with care about binary representation in case of negative numbers... Limit is 2^29

int ffn(int n) {

    n = n ^ (1 << 30); //flip the bit
    if (n>0)// if negative then there's a two's complement
    {
    	if (n & (1<<30))
    	{
    		return n;
    	}
    	else
    	{
    		return -n;
    	}
    }
    else
    {
    	if (n & (1<<30))
    	{
    		return -n;
    	}
    	else
    	{
    		return n;
    	}
    }


}
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number f( number n)
{
  static count(0);
  if(count > 0) return -n;
  return n;
}

f(n) = n

f(f(n)) = f(n) = -n
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3  
I think you somewhere miss a count++ –  sth Aug 24 '09 at 10:14
int f(const int n)  {
    static int last_n;

    if (n == 0)
        return 0;
    else if (n == last_n)
        return -n;
    else
    {
        last_n = n;
        return n;
    }
}

Hackish, but correct.

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int f(int n) {
    return ((n>0)? -1 : 1) * abs(n);
}
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1  
surely this just returns f(n)=-n ? then f(f(n)) = n, not -n as the question asks –  Sanjay Manohar Sep 24 '09 at 23:42
int j = 0;

void int f(int n)
{    
    j++;

    if(j==2)
    {
       j = 0;
       return -n;
    }

    return n;
}

:D

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How about this:

do
    local function makeFunc()
    	local var
    	return function(x)
    		if x == true then
    			return -var
    		else
    			var = x
    			return true
    		end
    	end

    end
    f = makeFunc()
end
print(f(f(20000)))
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f(n) { return IsWholeNumber(n)? 1/n : -1/n }
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C++

struct Value
{
  int value;
  Value(int v) : value(v) {}
  operator int () { return -value; }
};


Value f(Value input)
{
  return input;
}
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Python 2.6:

f = lambda n: (n % 2 * n or -n) + (n > 0) - (n < 0)

I realize this adds nothing to the discussion, but I can't resist.

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int f(int n)
{
   static int x = 0;
   result = -x;
   x = n;
   return result;
}

This is a one entry FIFO with negation. Of course it doesn't work for the max negative number.

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In Python

f=lambda n:n[0]if type(n)is list else[-n]
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Scala :

def f(x: Any): Any = x match {
  case i: Int => new { override def hashCode = -i }
  case i @ _  => i.hashCode
}

Same thing in Java :

public static Object f(final Object x) {
  if(x instanceof Integer) {
    return new Object() {
      @Override 
      public int hashCode() {
        return -(Integer)x;
      }
    };
  }
  return x.hashCode();
}
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Another Javascript solution utilizing short-circuits.

​function f(n) {return n.inv || {inv:-n}}

f(f(1)) => -1
f(f(-1)) => 1
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Thought I'd try this one without looking at other people's answers first:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <limits.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int f(int n) {
    if(n > 0) {  
        if(n % 2)
            return -(++n);
        else {
            return (--n);

        }
    }
    else {
        if(n % 2)
            return -(--n);
        else {
            return (++n);

        }
    }
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
    int n;
    for(n = INT_MIN; n < INT_MAX; n++) {
        int N = f(f(n));

        if(N != -n) {
            fprintf(stderr, "FAIL! %i != %i\n", N, -n);
        }
    }
    n = INT_MAX;
    int N = f(f(n));
    if(N != -n) {
        fprintf(stderr, "FAIL! n = %i\n", n);
    }
    return 0;
}

Output: [nothing]

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A C function:

int f(int n) /* Treats numbers in the range 0XC0000000 to 0X3FFFFFFF as valid to
                generate f(f(x)) equal to -x. If n is within this range, it will
                project n outside the range. If n is outside the range, it will
                return the opposite of the number whose image is n. */
{
    return n ? n > 0 ? n <= 0X3FFFFFFF ? 0X3FFFFFFF + n : 0X3FFFFFFF - n :\
           n >= 0XC0000000 ? 0XC0000000 + n : 0XC0000000 - n : 0;
}

Ideone Link for Testing and Download

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Similar to the functions overload solution, in python:

def f(number):
 if type(number) != type([]):
  return [].append(number)
 else:
  return -1*number[0]

Alternative: static datamembers

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Well, I am neither a math, nor a programming wizz, but isn't this pretty easy?

int f(int i) {
    static bool b;
    if (b) {
        b = !b;
        return i;
    } else {
        b = !b;
        return -i;
    }
}

Tested with big and small positive and negative values, INT_MIN, INT_MAX, it seems to work... Can be made thread safe if that is a concern, it wasn't a part of the assignment though.

Or maybe I am missing something?

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I believe this meets all the requirements. Nothing says that the parameters have to be 32 bit signed integers, only that the value 'n' you pass in is.

long long f(long long n)
{
    int high_int = n >> 32;
    int low_int  = n & 0xFFFFFFFF;

    if (high_int == 0) {
        return 0x100000000LL + low_int;
    } else {
        return -low_int;
    }
}
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C# overloading:

string f(int i) {
  return i.ToString();
}

int f(string s) {
  return Int32.Parse(s) * -1;
}

Or

object f(object o) {
  if (o.ToString.StartsWith("s"))
    return Int32.Parse(s.Substring(1)) * -1;
  return "s" + i.ToString();
}
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protected by NullPoiиteя Jun 10 '13 at 5:16

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