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A question I got on my last interview:

Design a function f, such that:

f(f(n)) == -n

Where n is a 32 bit signed integer; you can't use complex numbers arithmetic.

If you can't design such a function for the whole range of numbers, design it for the largest range possible.

Any ideas?

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73  
+1: Nothing wrong with this question, not sure why it was downvoted or has close votes. –  Juliet Apr 8 '09 at 21:13
51  
Apparently there are people who think that maths is not programming related. –  Tamas Czinege Apr 8 '09 at 21:14
39  
Or offensive? Does that button mean "I can't figure it out" now? –  1800 INFORMATION Apr 8 '09 at 21:14
149  
public int f(int n) { throw new NotImplementException("You get the rest of the code when you give me a job."); } –  Juliet Apr 8 '09 at 21:21
239  
What a terrible interview question. –  Daniel Daranas Apr 9 '09 at 9:40

118 Answers 118

Tcl:

proc f {input} {
    if { [string is integer $input] } {
      return [list expr [list 0 - $input]]
    } else {
      return [eval $input]
    }
}

% f [f 1]
-1

Along the lines of some of the other answers... if it's an integer, return a command that returns the negative of that number. If it's not a number, evaluate it and return the result.

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This is a C/C++ solution that doesn't utilize any bitwise operators, and doesn't require any math libraries, though it's kind of cheating...

double f(double n)
{
    if (n == (double)(int)n)
        return n + 0.5;
    else
        return -(n - 0.5);
}

This works for all 32-bit integers with the single exception of 0x80000000 (since its opposite cannot be stored in the 32-bit integer system). f(f(n)) == -n will always be true except in that one case.

I'm sure there's a simpler and faster way to implement it, though. This was just the first thing that came to mind.

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int func(int a)  
{   
    static int p = 0;  
    int ret = a;  

    if ( p ) ret *= -1;  
    p ^= 1;  

    return ret;  
}  
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This idea's been used in other answers, but I got it into one line of Python:

def f(n):
    return str(n) if type(n) == int else -int(n)
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int f(int n)
{
  static long counter=0;
  counter++;
  if(counter%2==0)
    return -n;
  else
    return n;
}
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#include <cmath>

int f(int n)
{
    static int count = 0;
    return ::cos(M_PI * count++) * n;
}
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3  
Should be noted that this could give problems in a multithreaded environment. –  TommyA Dec 21 '10 at 12:03

A Solution in SQL Server

create function dbo.fn_fo(@num int) -- OUTER FUNCTION
RETURNS int
AS
begin
RETURN @num * -1
end
GO

create function dbo.fn_fi(@num int) -- INNER FUNCTION
RETURNS int
AS
begin
RETURN @num * -1
end
GO

declare @num AS int = -42
SELECT dbo.fn_fo(dbo.fn_fi(@num)) -- Gives (-42)
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perhaps I'm missing something?

Is this not something as simple as:

    function f(n)
    {
        if(n ==0 || n < 0){return n;}
        return n * -1;
    }

Edit:

so I have miss read the question, ho-hum, so:

    function f(n)
    {
        if(!c(n,"z")&&!c(n,"n")){if(n==0){return "z"+n;}return "n"+n;}
        if( c(n,"z")){return 0;}return parseInt(n.replace("n",""))*-1;
    }
    function c(x,y){return x.indexOf(y) !==-1;}

ugly but works.

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1  
The question is not about f(n), but about f(f(n)). f(f(-1)) should return 1, your solution would return -1 –  Kane Jun 25 '13 at 11:58

f(x) = the point (x) rotated 90 degrees counterclockwise around the origin in a 2D Cartesian coordinate system. Inputs of only one number x are presumed to be (x, 0), and outputs having y=0 are provided as the single number x.

object f: (object) x {
    if (x.length == 1)
        x = (x, 0)
    swap = x[0]
    x[1] = x[0]
    x[0] = -swap
    if (x[1] == 0)
        x = x[0]
    return x
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I confess that I'd cheat, but meet the requirements nevertheless. This is programming wizardry, not really Mathematics. It works for the whole range, except -2^31.

int f(int n)
{
    static bool eFlag = false; // Only executed once
    eFlag = !eFlag;
    return eFlag?-n:n;
}
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Another cheating solution in C++, operator overloading.

struct func {
    int n;
    func operator()(int k) { n = -k; return *this; }
    int operator()(const func &inst) { return inst.n; }
} f;
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I don't know if this is completely right, but wouldn't a simple flag work? In C, using a static local variable, I successfully did this:

int main()
{
    int n = -256; // 32-bit signed integer
    printf("%d", f(f(n)));
}

int f(int n){
    static int x = 0; // not returning negative;
    switch(x){
        case 0:
            x = 1;
            return n;
            break;

        case 1:
            x = 0;
            return -n;
            break;
        default:
            return -999;
            break;
    }
}
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Objective-C

This works for all numbers except "-1".

If you are to go from using int to using NSInt then you can set -1 values to NULL and then convert them the second time to +1, but I feel that NSInt cheats what the asker intended.


f(n):

-(int)f:(int)n {
    if (abs(n)==1) {
        n = -1;
    } else {
        if (abs(n)%2) {//o
            if (n>0) {//+
                n--;
                n*=+1;
            } else if (n<0) {//-
                n++;
                n*=+1;
            }
        } else {//e
            if (n>0) {//+
                n++;
                n*=-1;
            } else if (n<0) {//-
                n--;
                n*=-1;
            }
        }
    }
    return n;
}

Of course this could all be shortened down to like one line, but then other people might not be able to read along...


Anyways, I stored the BOOLEAN logic in the state of the number being either odd or even.

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a simple solution in f# (not using "tricks")

let rec f n =
    if n = 0 then 0
    elif n > 0 then
        if (f (n - 1) <> n) then n + 1
        else -(n - 1)
    else
        if (f (-(n - 1)) = n) then n - 1
        else -(n + 1) 
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F#

let f n =
    match n with
    | n when n % 2 = 0 -> -n + System.Math.Sign n
    | _ -> n - System.Math.Sign -n

where n such that System.Int32.MinValue < n < System.Int32.MaxValue.

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I tried golfing this answer by Rodrick Chapman.

Without branches: 74 chars

int f(int i){return(-((i&1)<<1)|1)*i-(-((i>>>31)<<1)|1)*(((i|-i)>>31)&1);}

With branches, Java style: 58 chars

int f(int i){return i==0?0:(((i&1)==0?i:-i)+(i>0?-1:1));}

With branches, C style: 52 chars

int f(int i){return i?(((i&1)?-i:i)+(i>0?-1:1)):0;}

After a quick, but valid, benchmark, the branched version turns out to be 33% faster on my machine. (Random dataset of positive and negative numbers, enough repetition and prevented the compiler to optimize out the code, with warmup.) This is not so surprising, given the number of operations in the unbranched version and the possible good branch prediction because of the fact that the function is called twice: f(f(i)). When I change the benchmark to measure: f(i), the branched version is only 28% faster. I think this proves that the branch prediction actually did some good in the first case. More prove: when testing with f(f(f(f(i)))), it turns out the branched version is 42% faster.

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Solution in the Wolfram Language:

f[f[n_]] := -n

Application:

In[2]:= f[f[10]]                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
Out[2]= -10
In[3]:= f[10]                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Out[3]= f[10]

Because the question does not say anything the value of f(n), f[n] remains unevaluated.

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Javascript

function f(n)  { 
        return typeof n === "number" ? 
        function() {return -n} : 
        n();
}
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Based on the questions that Microsoft/Google's interviewers usually ask in their interviews, I believe the asker means an innovative, lightweight, simple solution that will use bitwise operations, not those complicated high level answers.

Inspired by the answer of @eipipuz, I wrote this C++ function (yet didn't run it):

int32_t f(int32_t n){
    int32_t temp = n & 00111111111111111111111111111111;
    x = n >> 30;
    x++;
    x = x << 30;
    return x | temp;
}

It stores the leftmost two bits of n in x, adds 1 to x, and then replaces it as the leftmost two bits of n again.

If we keep running f(n) with another f(n) as the parameter n, the leftmost two bits will rotate like this:

00 --> 01 --> 10 --> 11 --> 00 ...

Note that the rightmost 30 bits don't change. Examples for 8 bit integers:

Example 1:

  • > f(00001111) = 01001111
  • > f(01001111) = 10001111 [this is negative of the original value, 00001111]

Example 2:

  • > f(11101010) = 00101010
  • > f(00101010) = 01101010 [this is negative of the original value, 11101010]
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int f(int x){
    if (x < 0)
        return x;
    return ~x+1; //two's complement
}
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PHP, without using a global variable:

function f($num) {
  static $mem;

  $answer = $num-$mem;

  if ($mem == 0) {
    $mem = $num*2;
  } else {
    $mem = 0;
  }

  return $answer;
}

Works with integers, floats AND numeric strings!

just realized this does some unnecessary work, but, whatever

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Isn't remembering your last state a good enough answer?

int f (int n)
{
    //if count 
    static int count = 0;

    if (count == 0)
        { 
            count = 1;
            return n;
        }

    if (n == 0)
        return 0;
    else if (n > 0)
    {
        count = 0;
        return abs(n)*(-1);
    } 
    else
    {
        count = 0;
        return abs(n);
    }
}

int main()
{
    int n = 42;
    std::cout << f(f(n))
}
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I thought the largest range possible was hinting at a modular arithmetic solution. In some modular bases M there is number which when squared is congruent to M-1 (which is congruent to -1). For example if M=13, 5*5=25, 25 mod 13=12 (= -1)
Anyway here's some python code for M=2**32-3.

def f(x):
    m=2**32-3;
    halfm=m//2;
    i_mod_m=1849436465
    if abs( x ) >halfm:
        raise "too big"
    if x<0:
        x+=m
    x=(i_mod_m*x) % m
    if (x>halfm):
        x-=m
    return x;

Note there are 3 values it wont work for 2 ** 31-1, -(2 ** 31-1) and -(2 ** 31)

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it's cheating by saving state but it works, break operation into two: -n = (~n + 1) for integers

int f(int n) {
    static int a = 1;
    a = !a;
    if (a) {
        return (~n);
    } else {
        return (n+1);
    }
}
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using a cyclic permutation method to do this.

-b a b -a

a b -a -b

in the trivial situation f(0) returns 0

sorry for my rough answer by my phone, after 28th i will post a full version (now examing... ) briefly saying, think f(n) is a cyclic permutation,the questions is how to construct it.

define fk = f(f(f(f(...f(n))))) (k fs) situation k=2 0.trivial situation f(0) returns 0 1. make groups , in situation k=2, groups: {0} {1,2} {3,4} ... {n,n+1 | (n+1)%2 = 0 } ,attention: I ONLY use Z+, because the construction doesnt need use negative number. 2.construct permutation : if n % 2 = 0, so a=n-1 b=n if n % 2 = 1, so a=n b=n+1

this will generate the same permutation, because n and f(n) are in the same group.

note the permutation as P return P(n)

for k=2t , only doing the same things above, just MOD k. for k=2t-1, although the method works, but it makes no sense, ahh? (f(n) = -n is ok)

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I haven't looked at the other answers yet, I assume the bitwise techniques have been thoroughly discussed.

I thought I'd come up with something evil in C++ that is hopefully not a dupe:

struct ImplicitlyConvertibleToInt
{
    operator int () const { return 0; }
};

int f(const ImplicitlyConvertibleToInt &) { return 0; }

ImplicitlyConvertibleToInt f(int & n)
{
    n = 0; // The problem specification didn't say n was const
    return ImplicitlyConvertibleToInt();
}

The whole ImplicitlyConvertibleToInt type and overload is necessary because temporaries can't be bound to a non-const reference.

Of course, looking at it now it's undefined whether f(n) is executed before -n.

Perhaps a better solution with this degree of evil is simply:

struct ComparesTrueToInt
{
    ComparesTrueToInt(int) { } // implicit construction from int
};
bool operator == (ComparesTrueToInt, int) const { return true; }

ComparesTrueToInt f(ComparesTrueToInt ct) { return ComparesTrueToInt(); }
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In Less than 50 characters (C#)

int f(int n) { return (n <= 0) ? n : f(-n); }

Or easier to read:

static int f(int n) { 
  if (n <= 0)
    return n;
  else 
    return f(-n);
}

To Test

static void Main(string[] args) {
    for (int n = int.MinValue; n < int.MaxValue; n+=1) {
        Console.Out.WriteLine("Value: " + n + " Result: " + f(f(n)));
    }
}

And it works ( assuming I understand the question properly )

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How about

int f(int n)
{
    return -abs(n);
}
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protected by NullPoiиteя Jun 10 '13 at 5:16

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