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Look at this piece of code I am working on at the moment (It's meant to parse some arguments from the arguments of the main method):

def parser[T](identifier: String, default: T, modifier: String => T): T = {
  val l = args.filter(_.startsWith(identifier))
  if(l.isEmpty) default
  else modifier(l(0).drop(identifier.length).trim)
}

I also intended to write an overloaded method that deals with the case of Strings:

def parser(identifier: String, default: String): String = parser[String](identifier, default, identity)

The compiler does not seem to be impressed with this and will not allow me to overload the method. I have to change the name of either of the methods to make this work:

def parser(identifier: String, default: String): String = genParser[String](identifier, default, identity)

Is there a reason I can't overload when type parameters are in use?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Overloading is not what the compiler is concerned about.

<console>:8: error: method parser: (identifier: String, default: String) String does not take type parameters.

This code:

parser[String](identifier, default, identity)

calls this method:

def parser(identifier: String, default: String): String

instead of this one as you would want:

def parser[T](identifier: String, default: T, modifier: String => T): T

This illustration compiles just fine:

val args = Array[String]()

def parser[T](identifier: String, default: T, modifier: String => T): T = {
  val l = args.filter(_.startsWith(identifier))
  if(l.isEmpty) default
  else modifier(l(0).drop(identifier.length).trim)
}

def parser(identifier: String, default: String): String = "dummy"
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Thanks for clearing that up. Do you have any idea how I could specify which "parser" I am using when defining the method? –  Henry Henrinson Sep 6 '11 at 12:41
    
Not really. Consider a slightly other design, where you would have a transformer of type String => String instead of the modifier, which is of type String => T. Knowing, that you need a function String => String you can provide a default value of the identity function like s => s) instead of overloading the whole method. You can modify the results in the next step. –  agilesteel Sep 6 '11 at 13:22
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