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I am trying to code up a small operating system and I have 100 processes that need to have unique process IDs generated automatically. they have to be generated sequentially in a round-robin fashion. Is there any algorithm for this? Any help? Thank you.

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3  
I think the generally accepted algorithm for sequential numbers is to add 1 to the last number you remember generating.... :) –  Paul Dixon Sep 6 '11 at 12:57
4  
And if you want the numbers to wrap around every N, id = ++id % N is the typical approach. –  Jon Sep 6 '11 at 13:01
    
thanks, can you explain the wrap around if you don't mind? –  Glove Sep 6 '11 at 13:14
1  
@Jon: I don't think there is a sequence point in the expression id = ++id % N. I like id = (id + 1) % N better. –  pmg Sep 6 '11 at 13:41
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The real "problem" is if you need to stop processes and start new ones. In that case, simply wrapping around is not enough. You need a way to not generate a process id that's already in use. –  nos Sep 6 '11 at 14:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Just make an array with 100 elements (initialized to 0) and manage that

int array[100] = {0};

/* kill process N */
void killprocess(int N) {
    array[N] = 0;
}

/* add process N */
void addprocess(int N) {
    array[N] = 1;
}

/* find free process starting with N */
int findfreeprocess(int N) {
    int k, ndx;
    for (k = 0; k < 100; k++) {
        ndx = (N + k) % 100;
        if (array[ndx] == 0) return ndx;
    }
    return -1; /* indicate no free process */
}
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I don't get the third part :s can you explain further? –  Glove Sep 6 '11 at 15:19
    
It assumes the array is a circular buffer and searches for a zero element starting with N, "going back" to 0 once it reaches 99. If all elements are different than 0, return -1 to indicate just that. –  pmg Sep 6 '11 at 15:26
    
hows N initialized? –  Glove Sep 6 '11 at 15:31
    
see if it's better now, after my edits –  pmg Sep 6 '11 at 15:34
    
thank you so much for your help –  Glove Sep 6 '11 at 15:39

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