Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If I try to do this it doesn't work:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int a = 5000;
    Console.WriteLine((string)a);
}

But somehow this works fine:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int a = 5000;
    Console.WriteLine(a + "");
}

Why is that? Is it because the first is trying to change the base type and the second just appends the value to the string?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 44 down vote accepted

int cannot be cast to string (1), but there is an operator + that accepts int as left-hand argument and string as right-hand argument (2). This operator converts the int to string and concatenates the two strings.

A better approach would probably be to just use Console.WriteLine(a); which would call a.ToString() for you.

share|improve this answer
3  
Upvote for identifying it's the operator that does the conversion. –  Ray Sep 6 '11 at 13:20
    
aka, you're misinterpreting the cast operator, which shouldn't call the toString method. –  FallingBullets Sep 6 '11 at 13:20
1  
I can't find such an operator defined on either String or Int32... Where is it defined? –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Sep 6 '11 at 13:21
3  
Section "7.8.4 Addition operator" in Microsoft's C# language specification (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms228593.aspx) shows the definition. –  tinman Sep 6 '11 at 13:26
2  
@tinman you beat me to it: "If an operand of string concatenation is null, an empty string is substituted. Otherwise, any non-string argument is converted to its string representation by invoking the virtual ToString method inherited from type object. If ToString returns null, an empty string is substituted." –  Ray Sep 6 '11 at 13:29

So you are getting a compile time error right? The problem is is that int does not explicitly cast to string.

So

(string)a

is not valid code but

a + ""

mean that the code will work because it basically get translated to

a.ToString() + ""

So the int gets converted into a string value

share|improve this answer
    
It's not possible to write an overloaded conversion operator from int to string. What type would you write the operator on? (We considered adding "extension conversion operators" to C# 4 but never got past the design stage.) –  Eric Lippert Sep 6 '11 at 14:08
    
@Eric, of course you are right (surprisingly), I had thought I would be able to do like with extension methods. Never needed to do it before, and never tried until now. Just something I assumed would be possible. Even if you had added it I don't think I would ever use. It could be misleading as it would not be obvious that it was using an extension and it may confuse other coders when reading some code –  musefan Sep 6 '11 at 14:44

You should use:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int a = 5000;
    Console.WriteLine(a);
}

that implicitly calls a.ToString()

share|improve this answer
    
whatever it uses... it works. Nowhere in the question did it say anything about operator+. Question asked why it didn't work... this answer, and others, points out why. –  WernerCD Sep 7 '11 at 2:26

To cast a int in a string you must use int32.parse(string )

That's not right, the parse method of Int32 returns an integer, which is parsed from a string.

To get the string representation of another datatype just use .ToString() from Object Class. Or you use System.Convert.ToString()

share|improve this answer

That doesn't work because as you have assigned an purely integer value in to a you can not convert it into string by an implicit conversion, but which will work as follows

 static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int a = 5000;
        Console.WriteLine(a);
    }

which is equal to Console.WriteLine(a.ToString());

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.