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I have a url that looks similar to

//google.com/Ucomm/Photos/1984 Digital Photos/blah blah/Reflections Magazine/Fall 1984    issue/This is what I want 7-28/TMI_7840_xx.PNG

Each URL is different but I want the same part out of it which would be the part right before the filename.
I figured if I counted the number of backslashes I could print what's in between the second to the last one and the last one..

So the output would look like

This is what I want 7-28

What I have so far counts the number of backslashes but I am not sure how to print what I need.

The Code:

my $string = $cells[74];
my $count = lc($string) =~ tr/\///;
print $count;
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4  
I see no backslashes, Windowsboy. –  tchrist Sep 6 '11 at 14:06

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You don't need to count slashes (and those are forward slashes, not backslashes), just start at the end and work backwards.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use v5.10;

my $string = "//google.com/Ucomm/Photos/1984 Digital Photos/blah blah/Reflections Magazine/Fall 1984    issue/This is what I want 7-28/TMI_7840_xx.PNG";

say "Version 1";
{
        my @parts = split '/', $string;
        say $parts[-2];
}

say "Version 2"; # if you love regular expressions
{
        my ($captured) = $string =~ m!/([^/]+)/[^/]+$!;
        say $captured;
}
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This worked perfectly... I had to use print instead of say becuase of a weird error.. but Regular expressions are crazy... –  David Boord Sep 6 '11 at 14:11
    
@David Did you forget to use v5.10 or use feature qw(say)? say is not a core function. –  TLP Sep 6 '11 at 16:55

You can use basename and dirname for that:

use File::Basename;

my $str="//google.com/Ucomm/Photos/1984 Digital Photos/blah blah/Reflections Magazine/Fall 1984    issue/This is what I want 7-28/TMI_7840_xx.PNG";

print basename(dirname($str));

Alternatively, split the string on / and take the before-last element.

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You could use split

my @data = split('/', $string);
print $data[-2];
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That would get the data between the first and second slash, not between the penultimate and last slash. –  Quentin Sep 6 '11 at 14:08
1  
And using a regular expression when you are splitting on a single character is just messy. –  Quentin Sep 6 '11 at 14:09
    
@Quentin I should really fully read the question before answering.... –  Bruce Sep 6 '11 at 14:21
    
split always treats the first argument as a regular expression –  mob Sep 6 '11 at 16:27

Break the input into an array. The question is: How do identify the field you want? By position?

    #!/usr/bin/env perl

    use strict;
    use warnings;

    use Data::Dumper;

    # Make Data::Dumper pretty
    $Data::Dumper::Sortkeys = 1;
    $Data::Dumper::Indent   = 1;

    # Set maximum depth for Data::Dumper, zero means unlimited
    local $Data::Dumper::Maxdepth = 0;

    my $string = '//google.com/Ucomm/Photos/1984 Digital Photos/blah blah/Reflections Magazine/Fall 1984    issue/This is what I want 7-28/TMI_7840_xx.PNG';

    my @array = split /\//, $string;
    print Dumper \@array;

__END__
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You can use a regular expression:

if ($str=~/([^\/]*)\/([^\/]*)$/) {
   print "$1\n"
} else {
   print "ERROR\n"
}

Example:

perl -e '$str="google.com/Ucomm/Photos/1984 Digital Photos/blah blah/Reflections Magazine/Fall 1984    issue/This is what I want 7-28/TMI_7840_xx.PNG"; if ($str=~/([^\/]*)\/([^\/]*)$/) {print "$1\n"} else {print "ERROR\n"}'

This is what I want 7-28
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