Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
char[] a = { 'o', 'r', 'a', 'n', 'g', 'e' };

for (int i = 0; i < a.Length/2; i++)
{        
  a[i] = (char)(((uint)a[i])|((uint)a[a.Length-(i+1)]));
  a[a.Length-(i+1)] = (char)(((uint)a[i])^((uint)a[a.Length-(i+1)]));
  a[i] = (char)(((uint)a[i])^((uint)a[a.Length-(i+1)]));
}

I know how to implement this using standard .NET functionality and temp vars. I am just curious what specifically I am doing wrong in the above example that causes it not to work when the following works fine:

int a = 5;
int b = 10;

a = a | b;
b = a ^ b;
a = a ^ b;

Isn't the above string version just a series of those?

share|improve this question
    
its horribly undecipherable? –  Andrew Bullock Apr 8 '09 at 22:36
    
You can just write char[] a = "orange", I believe. –  Ben Alpert Apr 8 '09 at 22:36
    
I was trying to extend the standard OR/XOR/XOR int swap to a string. That's all it is. –  cakeforcerberus Apr 8 '09 at 22:37
    
    
you are using c# so leave this C-based syntax. –  boj Apr 8 '09 at 22:39

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Hehe, there's no such thing as an OR/XOR/XOR swap - it should be a "triple xor" swap.

int a = 8, b = 10;
a ^= b;
b ^= a;
a ^= b;

I don't see why you want to use it (aside from the novelty value)

share|improve this answer
    
Yep. You're right. Thanks! =) –  cakeforcerberus Apr 8 '09 at 22:48
    
(And it was just novelty value) :P –  cakeforcerberus Apr 8 '09 at 22:48

The reason it's not working is that you're using a bad example. You can't swap two values by using OR then XOR then XOR. It only worked in your example because 5 and 10 have no bits in common, so the first OR doesn't destroy any information:

a = 0101 #5
b = 1010 #10
# step 1 (OR into a)
a = 1111
b = 1010
# step 2 (XOR into b)
a = 1111
b = 0101
# step 3 (XOR into a)
a = 1010 #10
b = 0101 #5

But it won't work if they have any bits in common - let's try with 13 and 10:

a = 1101 #13
b = 1010 #10
# step 1 (OR into a)
a = 1111
b = 1010
# step 2 (XOR into b)
a = 1111
b = 0101
# step 3 (XOR into a)
a = 1010 #10
b = 0101 #5

Note that we now have the values 5 and 10 still, even though we started with 13 and 10. What you're looking for is a thrice-XOR swap:

a = 1101 #13
b = 1010 #10
# step 1 (XOR into a)
a = 0111
b = 1010
# step 2 (XOR into b)
a = 0111
b = 1101
# step 3 (XOR into a)
a = 1010 # 10
b = 1101 #13
share|improve this answer

It's destructive (because of the bitwise OR). Why not use a temporary variable in your loop instead of the exclusive ORs:

int tmp = a[i];
a[i] = a[a.Length-(i+1)];
a[a.Length-(i+1)] = tmp;

In answer to your second part, what you were doing in binary is:

a = 0101;
b = 1010;
a = 0101 | 1010 === 1111;
...

When you OR the two values together, you destroy the original numbers. It works with 5 & 10 because none of the bits are common between the two numbers. When you do this with the following:

a = 0110;  // 6 (base ten)
b = 1010;  // 10 (base ten)
a = a | b; // this is now 1110, or 14 (base ten)

You can not recover 6 and 10 again, because OR was an irreversible operation. Exclusive-OR is reversible.

share|improve this answer
    
What's the fun in that? =) I certainly can do it with a temp var. I was just trying to work out the non-temp var version for kicks. –  cakeforcerberus Apr 8 '09 at 22:42
    
That makes sense. Thanks Rick! –  cakeforcerberus Apr 8 '09 at 22:53

Sorry if this is not the point of your question, but how about just:

 char[] a = { 'o', 'r', 'a', 'n', 'g', 'e' };
 a = Array.Reverse(a)

Am I missing something?

share|improve this answer

Others have already pointed out the correct solution using XOR operations... This isn't exactly an answer, but I thought I'd point you that the Interlocked.Exchange method is very suitable for this sort of task. (It performs the swap as an atomic operation and therefore works across threads, though that seems irrelevant here.) Nonetheless, I would almost always consider it the simplest/most elegant solution for swapping two variables.

Here's an example of how to use it with the code you posted.

char[] a = { 'o', 'r', 'a', 'n', 'g', 'e' };

for (int i = 0; i < a.Length/2; i++)
{        
    a[a.Length-(i+1)] = Interlocked.Exchange(ref a[a.Length-(i+1)], a[i]);
}

Hope that helps, even if it isn't specifically an answer to your question...

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. It is good to know about the Interlocked.Exchange. It may come in handy in the future. Thanks Noldorin! –  cakeforcerberus Apr 8 '09 at 22:56
List<char> characters = new List<char>();

characters.AddRange("string".ToCharArray());

characters.Reverse();

string reversed = new string(characters.ToArray());
share|improve this answer
    
I'm just wondering why this works: int a = 5; int b = 10; a = a | b; b = a ^ b; a = a ^ b; But the above code does not. –  cakeforcerberus Apr 8 '09 at 22:38
    
You got lucky - 10 and 5 don't have any bits in common. Try 10 and 8, for example. –  v3. Apr 8 '09 at 22:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.