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I'm having trouble in creating a one-to-one relationship between two tables in MS Access - when I create the relationship, it defaults to "Many-to-one", and I don't see an option to change it. Is there a way to do this?

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

Access has no such concept. You can either conflate the two tables into one, or place unique indexes on both tables for the common field(s). Are there other benefits you would expect?

You could I suppose create FK relationships in both directions, but I'm not sure what it would gain you except maybe query hints.


EDIT: Important update note from comment -

I don't see the problem. I opened a random DB on my computer, duplicated a table, and opened the Relationships editor. Dragged one ID field to another to create a relationship. http://i43.tinypic.com/2v30x7c.png One-to-one is an option. – Brendan Kidwell

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I don't see the problem. I opened a random DB on my computer, duplicated a table, and opened the Relationships editor. Dragged one ID field to another to create a relationship. i43.tinypic.com/2v30x7c.png One-to-one is an option. – Brendan Kidwell Apr 9 '09 at 18:47
    
Good info, thx - added comment above. – dkretz Apr 9 '09 at 18:54
    
What do you mean by "Access has no such concept?" Sure, Jet is the actual database engine, but nobody distinguishes the two. Jet certainly allows the creation of a 1:1 relationship as long as the joined fields both have unique indexes and are compatible data types. – David-W-Fenton Apr 9 '09 at 21:57
1  
BTW, there are perfectly valid reasons to partition a table into separate 1:1 tables, e.g., supertype/subtype relationships, or, to move complex data types (memos, BLOBs, OLE) into another table to protect the main table from any corruption of the pointers that are stored for those data types. – David-W-Fenton Apr 9 '09 at 21:59
    
Yup, that's why I asked about what benefits were expected. – dkretz Apr 9 '09 at 22:03

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