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I know everyone is going to jump in and say "No!" - but can you do a bit better and explain why.

Why am I asking this?

I'm finding myself working with a lot of legacy SQL (using Django) where tables are set up in a traditional way.

Parent table

id  name
0   ParentA
1   ParentB    

Child table

id parent_id name
0    0       ChildA0
1    0       ChildA1
2    1       ChildB1

Now because of the nature of my work (I'm simply using the data and not modifying it) and I am often times wondering instead of doing this..

class Parent(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=255)

    class Meta:
        managed = False

class Child(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=255)
    parent = models.IntegerField()

    class Meta:
        managed = False

To this..

class Parent(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=255)

    class Meta:
        managed = False

class Child(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=255)
    parent = models.ForeignKey(Parent, db_column ='parent')

    class Meta:
        managed = False

It would certainly make my life easier?? And if it's just an integer I would think go for it.. But I want to ask the experts first.

FYI: The table structure is as follows:

CREATE TABLE `Parent` (
  `id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `name` varchar(255) NOT NULL
  UNIQUE KEY `id` (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=12 DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

CREATE TABLE `pmVariants` (
  `id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `parent` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `name` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  UNIQUE KEY `id` (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=84 DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Short answer: no

A foreign key in MySQL can be anything: an int a string whatever.
It is smart to keep your keys as short a possible, so an integer is a logical and fast choice.

A word of advice: never use a unique key if you can use a primary key (PK) instead.
They may look the same to you, but they are not the same to the DB.
If a table has no PK, MySQL will create a hidden integer auto_increment PK instead.
This is very wasteful and disables lots of optimizations, esp on InnoDB.

share|improve this answer
    
Hey I didn't know that - thanks a lot! That said if it is an int can I refer to it as a ForeignKey in Django? Great answer! –  rh0dium Sep 6 '11 at 15:27
    
+1, however only InnoDB will create a hidden PK. MyISAM handles PK in a different (worse) way. What's wasteful is using extra space (6 bytes vs 4 bytes assuming that the general practice is using 4 byte integers). It doesn't seem like a lot of space unless there are billions of records where it really does contribute to waste of space. Excellent answer however. –  N.B. Sep 6 '11 at 15:38
    
@N.B. I didn't want to go into that much detail, but InnoDB includes the PK on every index, so you will get an extra 4 bytes on the table+an extra 4 bytes on the index + and extra 4 bytes for an index you don't need. That's 12 bytes per row. The performance hurt is even worse. –  Johan Sep 6 '11 at 15:49

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