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I have a large table in a database and I want to track changes made to the individual records. More precisely, I want to log the date and the changes made to the columns.

Since the table has 25+ comlumns I don't want to test them individually.

The logging table looks like ID-Date-Table-Column-OldValue-NewValue

In my AFTER UPDATE trigger I'd like to check which columns have different values and log them into my table.

I know I can get the columns of the table with:

DECLARE @meta_table TABLE (  
    idx smallint Primary Key IDENTITY(1,1) 
    , TABLE_NAME nchar(100), COLUMN_NAME nchar(100), COLUMN_ID int 
) 

INSERT @meta_table 
SELECT TABLE_NAME, COLUMN_NAME,
    COLUMNPROPERTY(OBJECT_ID(TABLE_SCHEMA + '.' + TABLE_NAME),
    COLUMN_NAME, 'ColumnID') AS COLUMN_ID
FROM MYDATABASE.INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS
WHERE TABLE_NAME = 'myTable';

I can iterate the columns with:

SET @i = 1 
SET @numrows = (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM @meta_table) 
IF @numrows > 0 
    WHILE (@i <= (SELECT MAX(idx) FROM @meta_table)) 
    BEGIN 
        SET @col = (SELECT COLUMN_NAME FROM @meta_table WHERE idx = @i)

        -- do something with @col

        SET @i = @i + 1 
    END

In a first step I'd like to check all columns but something like this does not work

IF (SELECT @col FROM inserted) <> (SELECT @col FROM deleted)
BEGIN
    -- INSERT into logging table ...
END

Additionally that would only check the first row of updates, so I would need to do that for each row in the deleted/inserted table.

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Have you looked at COLUMNS_UPDATED()? –  HABO Sep 6 '11 at 20:23
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Change Data Capture can be a solution to log table DML changes.

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There is no point in iterating over the table columns. Since the trigger is for a specific table, you already know what columns it has! Simply code the trigger with the columns you're interested in. You say that this may be a repetitive, boring, error prone task? Good programmers in such cases automate the task, eg. resort to code generation to generate the triggers automatically, refactor them in an instant and keep them in sync with schema changes. Deploying runtime schema discovery is not the way to go.

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The columns are not under my control and can be added / removed at any time, so I have to get the columns at runtime. –  Darcara Sep 7 '11 at 6:04
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Hmm - if you want to log ONLY the fields that have changed, then you would definitely need to check each field separately. However, as you found out, the compare doesn't work the same on different data types. So you will probably need to check the data types of each field, and do the compare accordingly. I believe there is a field called 'DATA_TYPE' in INFORMATION_SCHEMA, so when you do your meta table insert, add the additional column:


INSERT @meta_table  
SELECT TABLE_NAME, COLUMN_NAME, DATA_TYPE,
    COLUMNPROPERTY(OBJECT_ID(TABLE_SCHEMA + '.' + TABLE_NAME), 
    COLUMN_NAME, 'ColumnID') AS COLUMN_ID 
FROM MYDATABASE.INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS 
WHERE TABLE_NAME = 'myTable'; 


And then check for it in your loop:


SET @i = 1    
SET @numrows = (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM @meta_table)    
IF @numrows > 0    
    WHILE (@i <= (SELECT MAX(idx) FROM @meta_table))    
    BEGIN    
        SELECT @col = COLUMN_NAME, @dataType = DATA_TYPE
        FROM @meta_table WHERE idx = @i)   

        -- do something with @col   

        SET @i = @i + 1    
    END   

And then you have top check the datatype before you do the comparison..


IF(@dataType = 'varchar')
BEGIN

-- do your comparison and insert here

END
ELSE IF(@dataType = 'int')
BEGIN

-- do you comparison and insert here

END
....



... and so on, for all the different datatypes you have in the table...

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Hmm - so I guess you also want to do this for multiple rows, in the case an update statement modified multiple rows - in which case, you need to cursor select all the modified rows, and then check each one.... –  M.R. Sep 6 '11 at 15:56
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