Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a couple of pictures with different aspect ratio and different orientation (vertical/horizontal).

I'd like to show them in a grid, with every block of the grid 200px wide and 200px heigh. I know how to create the grid ("float: left; width: 200px; height: 200px").

How could I put the images in there? I'd like to resize them so that the SHORTEST side becomes the 200px of the block, and "crop" (probably with "overflow: hidden"?) the longer side to the same 200px.

Is this possbile with only CSS ? If not, how would you solve it? Resize server side so that the longest side is always "correct" (200px) ?

What I have so far ...

<div class="grid">

    <div class="item">

        <img src="pic1.jpg"/>

    </div>
    <div class="item">

        <img src="pic1.jpg"/>

    </div>
    <div class="item">

        <img src="pic1.jpg"/>

    </div>
    <div class="item">

        <img src="pic1.jpg"/>

    </div>
    <div class="item">

        <img src="pic1.jpg"/>

    </div>
    <div class="item">

        <img src="pic1.jpg"/>

    </div>
    <div class="item">

        <img src="pic1.jpg"/>

    </div>
    ....

</div>


.grid {
    width: 1000px;
}

.item {
    width: 200px;
    height: 200px;
    float: left;
}
share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can resize the images client-side like this:

img {
    height: 200px;
}

But you'd need JavaScript to determine which is the shorter side:

function resizeImg(img) {
    var h = img.height;
    var w = img.width;
    if (h > w) {
        img.style.width = "200px";
    }
    else {
        img.style.height = "200px";
    }
}

Your on the right track with overflow: hidden. Then just set the margin-height or margin-width of the image to ( 200 -sideLength) / 2.

Personally, I'd do it all server-side. Browsers aren't the best at scaling images. That statement was more true 5 years ago than it is now - they seem to do a pretty good job these days, so the point may be moot. But also, you can reduce the download size by returning pre-shrunk and cropped thumbnails from the server. I wrote a thumbnailer in C# that wrote the thumbnails to disk, so that it only had to process the image if it had never been requested before, otherwise it would return the saved image.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, that is a good answer AFTER the question was edited… –  feeela Sep 6 '11 at 17:23
add comment

I think it's not possible to determine the shortest dimension (width or height) via CSS, so you need to resize by the same dimension every time. But everything else is possible via CSS only:

<figure>
    <img src="someimg.png" />
</figure>

 

figure {
    // crop
    padding: 0;
    height: 200px;
    overflow: hidden;
    // grid align
    float: left;
    margin: 0 1em 1em 0;
}
img {
    // resizing by width
    width: 200px;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

If you want to scale the image proportionally to the container take a look at: http://haslayout.net/css-tuts/CSS-Proportional-Image-Scale

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.