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Have an MVC 2 app with default route:

routes.MapRoute(
  "Default",
  "{controller}/{action}/{id}",
  new { controller = "Home", action = "Index", id = "" }
);

This works great for everything we have except for one controller. When we browse to the url http://myserver/ThisOneController it doesn't fire the Index action and gives a 403.14 forbidden error. If I surf to http://myserver/ThisOneController/Index it works fine! Every other controller shows the expected behaviour.

The controller in question has an Index action method defined and viewing the folder in IIS seems to show no differences between that and other folders. It works in our production box but not on our test boxes...for the life of me, I can't find any differences between those boxes.

Any ideas?

share|improve this question

Add Glimpse to your project and check what route is being used. You can then find out if the problem is in your MVC app or the environment.

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This is expected behavior.

routes.MapRoute(
  "Default",
  "{controller}/{action}/{id}",
  new { controller = "Home", action = "Index", id = "" }
);

The above route means, you expect a controller/action/id, and the default (when nothing is provided) is root/Home/Index/. So any other controller with url like root/diffController/ is not matched, since you are providing a controller, but no action.

share|improve this answer
    
-1 - That's not entirely true; the default values are used even when some part of route is provided, so root/Home will invoke HomeController.Index action and root/Other will invoke OtherController.Index action. You can create a simple app to confirm this. – Jakub Konecki Sep 9 '11 at 10:30

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