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I'm looking to "cut" the top left corner of a div, like if you had folded the corner of a page down.

I'd like to do it in pure CSS, are there any methods?

share|improve this question
up vote 64 down vote accepted

If the parent element has a solid color background, you can use pseudo-elements to create the effect:

div {
    height: 300px;
    background: red;
    position: relative;
}

div:before {
    content: '';
    position: absolute;
    top: 0; right: 0;
    border-top: 80px solid white;
    border-left: 80px solid red;
    width: 0;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/2bZAW/


P.S. The upcoming border-corner-shape is exactly what you're looking for. Too bad it might get cut out of the spec, and never make it into any browsers in the wild :(

share|improve this answer
    
Never got around to actually accepting this answer, Thank you. – Rixius Jul 20 '13 at 0:23
    
I don't understand why this works. Before is used to prepend content to an element. What is causing the diagonal effect? – chiliNUT Jun 6 '14 at 22:46
4  
@chiliNUT - :before adds a pseudo element that can be styled independently of the main element. The pseudo element here is styled with a border, which creates the white triangle (when an element's borders meet, they're cut diagonally. – Joseph Silber Jun 6 '14 at 23:09
    
Oh, cool! I didn't know that. Thanks for the explanation! – chiliNUT Jun 7 '14 at 0:36
    
This is cool, but I believe I'm right in saying it only works when the background colour behind the parent element is white? – Andy Apr 27 at 15:16

If you need a transparent cut out edge, you can use a rotated pseudo element as a background for the div and position it to cut out the desired corner:

Transprent cut out edge on a div

body {
  background: url(http://i.imgur.com/k8BtMvj.jpg);
  background-size: cover;
}
div {
  position: relative;
  width: 50%;
  margin: 0 auto;
  overflow: hidden;
  padding: 20px;
  text-align: center;
}
div:after {
  content: '';
  position: absolute;
  width: 1100%; height: 1100%;
  top: 20px; right: -500%;
  background: rgba(255,255,255,.8);
  transform-origin: 54% 0;
  transform: rotate(45deg);
  z-index: -1;
}
<div>
  ... content ...<br/>... content ...<br/>... content ...<br/>... content ...<br/>... content ...<br/>... content ...<br/>... content ...<br/>... content ...<br/>... content ...<br/>... content ...<br/>
</div>

Note that this solution uses transforms and you need to add the required vendor prefixes. For more info see canIuse.

To cut the bottom right edge, you can change the top, transform and transform-origin properties of the pseudo element to:

body {
  background: url(http://i.imgur.com/k8BtMvj.jpg);
  background-size: cover;
}
div {
  position: relative;
  width: 50%;
  margin: 0 auto;
  overflow: hidden;
  padding: 20px;
  text-align: center;
}
div:after {
  content: '';
  position: absolute;
  width: 1100%; height: 1100%;
  bottom: 20px; right: -500%;
  background: rgba(255,255,255,.8);
  transform-origin: 54% 100%;
  transform: rotate(-45deg);
  z-index: -1;
}
<div>
  ... content ...<br/>... content ...<br/>... content ...<br/>... content ...<br/>... content ...<br/>... content ...<br/>... content ...<br/>... content ...<br/>... content ...<br/>... content ...<br/>
</div>

share|improve this answer
    
This is a really nice solution – Thomas Wood Jun 17 '15 at 0:19
    
Just if someone looking for 2 cuted corners solution: jsfiddle.net/o2udwet4 for previous/next buttons – Kiryl Jun 19 '15 at 13:50
1  
And final version for 2 cuted corners: jsfiddle.net/um6q76tu/1 – Kiryl Jun 19 '15 at 14:08
    
It would be nice if someone explained why this works. Something to do with the draw order of pseudo elements? – Adam Thomas Aug 6 '15 at 9:24
1  
@AdamThomas The background is applied to the :after pseudo-element, which extends beyond the parent div, and is rotated in such a way to not cover the top corner. Because the parent div specifies overflow: hidden, the parts of the :after pseudo-element which extend beyond it aren't visible. – Meshaal Jan 30 at 19:55

You could use a linear-gradient. Let's say the parent div had a background image, and you needed a div to sit on top of that with a gray background and a dog-eared left corner. You could do something like this:

.parent-div { background: url('/image.jpg'); }
.child-div { 
   background: #333;
   background: linear-gradient(135deg, transparent 30px, #333 0);
}

http://css-tricks.com/css3-gradients/

http://lea.verou.me/2011/03/beveled-corners-negative-border-radius-with-css3-gradients/

share|improve this answer
    
Sadly, doesn't look so nice in certain angles. – user280343 Oct 30 '14 at 8:14

If you need a diagonal border instead of a diagonal corner, you can stack 2 divs with each a pseudo element:

DEMO

http://codepen.io/remcokalf/pen/BNxLMJ

HTML

<div id="grey"></div>
<div class="container">
  <div class="diagonal">
    <h2>Header title</h2>
    <p>Yes a CSS diagonal corner is possible</p>
  </div>
  <div class="diagonal2">
    <h2>Header title</h2>
    <p>Yes a CSS diagonal corner with background image is possible</p>
  </div>
  <div class="diagonal3">
    <div class="inside">
      <h2>Header title</h2>
      <p>Yes a CSS diagonal border is even possible with an extra div</p>
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

CSS

.container {
  padding: 100px 200px;
  overflow: hidden;
}

div.diagonal {
  background: #da1d00;
  color: #fff;
  font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;
  width: 300px;
  height: 300px;
  padding: 70px;
  position: relative;
  margin: 30px;
  float: left;
}

div.diagonal2 {
  background: #da1d00;
  color: #fff;
  font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;
  width: 300px;
  height: 300px;
  padding: 70px;
  position: relative;
  margin: 30px;
  background: #da1d00 url(http://www.remcokalf.nl/background.jpg) left top;
  background-size: cover;
  float: left;
}

div.diagonal3 {
  background: #da1d00;
  color: #da1d00;
  font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;
  width: 432px;
  height: 432px;
  padding: 4px;
  position: relative;
  margin: 30px;
  float: left;
}

div.inside {
  background: #fff;
  color: #da1d00;
  font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;
  width: 292px;
  height: 292px;
  padding: 70px;
  position: relative;
}

div.diagonal:before,
div.diagonal2:before {
  content: '';
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
  border-top: 80px solid #fff;
  border-right: 80px solid transparent;
  width: 0;
}

div.diagonal3:before {
  content: '';
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
  border-top: 80px solid #da1d00;
  border-right: 80px solid transparent;
  width: 0;
  z-index: 1;
}

div.inside:before {
  content: '';
  position: absolute;
  top: -4px;
  left: -4px;
  border-top: 74px solid #fff;
  border-right: 74px solid transparent;
  width: 0;
  z-index: 2;
}

h2 {
  font-size: 30px;
  line-height: 1.3em;
  margin-bottom: 1em;
  position: relative;
  z-index: 1000;
}

p {
  font-size: 16px;
  line-height: 1.6em;
  margin-bottom: 1.8em;
}

#grey {
  width: 100%;
  height: 400px;
  background: #ccc;
  position: relative;
  margin-top: 100px;
}

#grey:before {
  content: '';
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
  border-top: 80px solid #fff;
  border-right: 80px solid #ccc;
  width: 400px;
}
share|improve this answer

CSS Clip-Path

Using a clip-path is a new, up and coming alternative. Its starting to get supported more and more and is now becoming well documented. Since it uses SVG to create the shape, it is responsive straight out of the box.

div {
  width: 200px;
  min-height: 200px;
  -webkit-clip-path: polygon(0 0, 0 100%, 100% 100%, 100% 25%, 75% 0);
  clip-path: polygon(0 0, 0 100%, 100% 100%, 100% 25%, 75% 0);
  background: lightblue;
}
<div>
  <p>Some Text</p>
</div>

CSS Transform

I have an alternative to web-tiki's transform answer.

body {
  background: lightgreen;
}
div {
  width: 200px;
  height: 200px;
  background: transparent;
  position: relative;
  overflow: hidden;
}
div.bg {
  width: 200%;
  height: 200%;
  background: lightblue;
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  left: -75%;
  transform-origin: 50% 50%;
  transform: rotate(45deg);
  z-index: -1;
}
<div>
  <div class="bg"></div>
  <p>Some Text</p>
</div>

share|improve this answer

Here is another approach using CSS transform: skew(45deg) to produce the cut corner effect. The shape itself involves three elements (1 real and 2 pseudo-elements) as follows:

  • The main container div element has overflow: hidden and produces the left border.
  • The :before pseudo-element which is 20% the height of the parent container and has a skew transform applied to it. This element prodcues the border on the top and cut (slanted) border on the right side.
  • The :after pseudo-element which is 80% the height of the parent (basically, remaining height) and produces the bottom border, the remaining portion of the right border.

The output produced is responsive, produces a transparent cut at the top and supports transparent backgrounds.

div {
  position: relative;
  height: 100px;
  width: 200px;
  border-left: 2px solid beige;
  overflow: hidden;
}
div:after,
div:before {
  position: absolute;
  content: '';
  width: calc(100% - 2px);
  left: 0px;
  z-index: -1;
}
div:before {
  height: 20%;
  top: 0px;
  border: 2px solid beige;
  border-width: 2px 3px 0px 0px;
  transform: skew(45deg);
  transform-origin: right bottom;
}
div:after {
  height: calc(80% - 4px);
  bottom: 0px;
  border: 2px solid beige;
  border-width: 0px 2px 2px 0px;
}
.filled:before, .filled:after {
  background-color: beige;
}

/* Just for demo */

div {
  float: left;
  color: beige;
  padding: 10px;
  transition: all 1s;
  margin: 10px;
}
div:hover {
  height: 200px;
  width: 300px;
}
div.filled{
  color: black;
}
body{
 background-image: radial-gradient(circle, #3F9CBA 0%, #153346 100%);
}
<div class="cut-corner">Some content</div>
<div class="cut-corner filled">Some content</div>

enter image description here


The below is another method to produce the cut corner effect by using linear-gradient background images. A combination of 3 gradient images (given below) is used:

  • One linear gradient (angled towards bottom left) to produce the cut corner effect. This gradient has a fixed 25px x 25px size.
  • One linear gradient to provide a solid color to the left of the triangle that causes the cut effect. A gradient is used even though it produces a solid color because we can control size, position of background only when images or gradients are used. This gradient is positioned at -25px on X-axis (basically meaning it would end before the place where the cut is present).
  • Another gradient similar to the above which again produces a solid color but is positioned at 25px down on the Y-axis (again to leave out the cut area).

The output produced is responsive, produces transparent cut and doesn't require any extra elements (real or pseudo). The drawback is that this approach would work only when the background (fill) is a solid color and it is very difficult to produce borders (but still possible as seen in the snippet).

.cut-corner {
  height: 100px;
  width: 200px;
  background-image: linear-gradient(to bottom left, transparent 50%, beige 50%), linear-gradient(beige, beige), linear-gradient(beige, beige);
  background-size: 25px 25px, 100% 100%, 100% 100%;
  background-position: 100% 0%, -25px 0%, 100% 25px;
  background-repeat: no-repeat;
}
.filled {
  background-image: linear-gradient(black, black), linear-gradient(black, black), linear-gradient(black, black), linear-gradient(black, black), linear-gradient(to bottom left, transparent calc(50% - 1px), black calc(50% - 1px), black calc(50% + 1px), beige calc(50% + 1px)), linear-gradient(beige, beige), linear-gradient(beige, beige);
  background-size: 2px 100%, 2px 100%, 100% 2px, 100% 2px, 25px 25px, 100% 100%, 100% 100%;
  background-position: 0% 0%, 100% 25px, -25px 0%, 0px 100%, 100% 0%, -25px 0%, 100% 25px;
}

/* Just for demo */

*{
  box-sizing: border-box;
  }
div {
  float: left;
  color: black;
  padding: 10px;
  transition: all 1s;
  margin: 10px;
}
div:hover {
  height: 200px;
  width: 300px;
}
body{
 background-image: radial-gradient(circle, #3F9CBA 0%, #153346 100%);
}
<div class="cut-corner">Some content</div>
<div class="cut-corner filled">Some content</div>

enter image description here

share|improve this answer

With a small edit to Joseph's code, the element does not require a solid background:

div {
    height: 300px;
    background: url('http://images2.layoutsparks.com/1/190037/serene-nature-scenery-blue.jpg');
    position: relative;
}

div:before {
    content: '';
    position: absolute;
    top: 0; right: 0;
    border-top: 80px solid white;
    border-left: 80px solid rgba(0,0,0,0);
    width: 0;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/2bZAW/1921/

This use of 'rgba(0,0,0,0)' allows the inner 'corner' to be invisible .

You can also edit the 4th parameter 'a', where 0 < a < 1, to have a shadow for more of a 'folded-corner' effect:

http://jsfiddle.net/2bZAW/1922/ (with shadow)


NOTE: RGBA color values are supported in IE9+, Firefox 3+, Chrome, Safari, and in Opera 10+.

share|improve this answer
    
This is very smart – smonff Jan 11 '14 at 15:14
2  
use the word 'transparent' instead of rgba(0,0,0,0) and you'll get greater support in IE7+ – rob_james Feb 19 '14 at 10:57
1  
The parent element however still has to be a solid color (e.g. in your example it is solid white), which I think was the limitation Joseph was referring to. @web-tiki's answer handles more complex backgrounds fantastically. – tobek Apr 19 '15 at 7:26

by small modification of Joshep's code...You can use this code which seems like right corner folded down as per your requirement.

div {
    height: 300px;
    background: red;
    position: relative;
}

div:before {
    content: '';
    position: absolute;
    top: 0; right: 0;
    border-top: 80px solid white;
    border-left: 80px solid blue;
    width: 0;
}
share|improve this answer
div {
  display:block;
  height: 300px;
  width: 200px;
  background: url('http://lorempixel.com/180/290/') no-repeat;
  background-size:cover;

  -webkit-clip-path: polygon(10px 0%, calc(100% - 10px) 0%, 100% 10px, 100% calc(100% - 10px), calc(100% - 10px) 100%, 10px 100%, 0% calc(100% - 10px), 0% 10px);
  clip-path: polygon(10px 0%, calc(100% - 10px) 0%, 100% 10px, 100% calc(100% - 10px), calc(100% - 10px) 100%, 10px 100%, 0% calc(100% - 10px), 0% 10px);
}

http://jsfiddle.net/2bZAW/5552/

enter image description here

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