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I'm building my program (tests actually) using some static library.
This library contains one file inside which I have functions like that:

string& GetString() {
    static string strFilename;
    return strFilename;
}

void PrintToScreen() {
    printf("String: %s\n", GetString().c_str())
}

Then in my main.cpp (outside the library) I'm doing:

GetString() = "abc";
printf("String: %s\n", GetString().c_str());
PrintToScreen();

And I get this output:

String: abc
String:

So looks like second call to the function (but done from different file, which is inside the library) somehow clear previous value, reinitialize it, or uses own copy of it.
I changed GetString function to use 'new' but result is exactly the same (btw. program never crash).
But I don't understand hot it's possible?
Any ideas what I'm doing wrong?

------------------------------- UPDATE ------------------------------

  1. Test is done is single threaded environment.
  2. It works on some platforms and on some it doesn't (works on windows, MacOS and AIX, doesn't work on linux, HP_UX, Solaris, FreeBSD...)
  3. I verified address of the strFilename during the execution (printf inside GetString) and looks like it's one variable without duplicates (address is always the same)
  4. BUT, with nm on the final lib I get something like that:

0000000000000030 T _Z16GetLogprintfFilev
0000000000000008 b _ZGVZ16GetLogprintfFilevE16strLogprintfFile
0000000000000018 b _ZZ16GetLogprintfFilevE16strLogprintfFile
U _Z16GetLogprintfFilev

and with nm on my base lib (used by final lib) I get:

0000000000000030 T _Z16GetLogprintfFilev
0000000000000008 b _ZGVZ16GetLogprintfFilevE16strLogprintfFile
0000000000000018 b _ZZ16GetLogprintfFilevE16strLogprintfFile

share|improve this question
    
is multithreading involved? –  Armen Tsirunyan Sep 6 '11 at 19:57
1  
Have you tried stepping through your code in a debugger to see where the calls are going, and what data they are accessing? –  Andrew Humphries Sep 6 '11 at 20:01
6  
@kuki: Well, this simplified example works as expected. Therefore, the structure is not identical to the real problem. Please post a minimal example that reproduces the problem. There's a fat chance that you will find your bug while constructing that example –  Armen Tsirunyan Sep 6 '11 at 20:03
1  
This code is fine. Your bug is in the code that you didn't show us. –  David Heffernan Sep 6 '11 at 20:07
1  
@kuki: It works differently as you've posted, i.e. it prints "abc" two times, as it should. Your code definitely contains some other bug which you will find when constructing a minimal example that reproduces the problem. If you don't, we'll happily help you find it when you update your question. Alternatively, I would suggest that you delete the question and post a fresh one with the good example after you've debugged your code and haven't found the issue. I, for one, am voting to close this –  Armen Tsirunyan Sep 6 '11 at 20:10

2 Answers 2

Yes this is quite possible when static linking.

Example:

 libA.a   // contains GetString()
          // Contains. PrintToScreen()
          // Here the reference has been resolved.

 libX.so  // Contains a call to GetString()
          // This library is linked with libA.a
          // Thus pulls in the function GetString() into this library.

 libY.so  // Contains a call to PrintToScreen()
          // This library is linked with libA.a
          // Thus pulls in the function PrintToScreen and GetString() into this library.

 a.out    // linked against libY.so libX.so
          // This has two distinct versions of GetString()

In the above example if a.out contains a call got getString() it is OS specific which version of getString() will be called. On most systems the load order of the individual shared library is used but on others it will do a depth first search of the shared libraries (ie lib X loads XA XB and Y loads YA YB. search order could be X XA XB Y YA YB or X Y XA XB YA YB). You need to consult each OS shared library documentation to understand how symbols are searched for at runtime.

The solution here is to only link against shared libraries (the default in most situations).
That way you only get one copy of libA (assuming you made libA a shared lib) and its content loaded into runtime only once (with no copies).

Note: This is not a failure at the language level.
This a failure caused by linking which is beyond the scope of the C/C++ language.

share|improve this answer
    
I was thinking exactly the same at first but I double checked that I'm not linking the same library twice. Well, I think I'll check third time tomorrow... –  Piotr Kukielka Sep 6 '11 at 20:16
    
@kuki: It would be interesting if you could tell us the exact libraries involved and how they are all linked together. If you are on a *nix like box nm will dump the symbols so you can see if GetString() is in more than one location. –  Loki Astari Sep 6 '11 at 20:19
    
Wouldn't this require the function to be static? Shouldn't it give a linker error otherwise? –  bitmask Sep 6 '11 at 20:21
    
@bitmask: No that is not necessary (but that is another way of achieving the same affect). In the situation described above each shared library is independent and can have overlapping exported identifiers and be successfully linked with the executable (The link stage is completely independent to compilation and is only trying to resolve symbols (not do duplicate detection). –  Loki Astari Sep 6 '11 at 20:24
    
@Tux-D: I have shared.lib (which contains both of the functions) and two other libraries merged into one server.lib library. Then at the end this server.lib is linked with the test files. Unlucky whole process is a bit more complicated (we are relinking server.lib before, etc.). I think I'll check nm output as you said, as well as print out address of strFilename during the execution. Update will come in ~12h from now ;) –  Piotr Kukielka Sep 6 '11 at 20:30
up vote -1 down vote accepted

Actually there was one missing think in example. It should look like this:

string& GetString() {
  static string strFilename;
  return strFilename;
}

extern "C" {
  void PrintToScreen() {
    printf("String: %s\n", GetString().c_str())
  }
}

Strange. Anyway, I refactored it to something like this:

extern "C" {
  string* GetString() {
    static string strFilename;
    return &strFilename;
  }

  void PrintToScreen() {
    printf("String: %s\n", GetString()->c_str())
  }
}

And it works without problem now.
Still it seems strange to me that compiler was not complaining.
Thanks to all for their contribution, problem is solved now.

---------------------------------- EDIT ----------------------------------

I experienced this problem again later so it was not proper fix.
The real problem was some singleton which was initialized
in meantime and had in the class constructor:

GetString() = "";

So, simple problem, but really hard to track...

share|improve this answer
    
Its good that you found the solution. Accept the answer so that it will be promoted to first place and people will be able to see it easily. –  vrbilgi Sep 7 '11 at 12:08
    
I'll do that, but I get the message that I can do this tomorrow ;) –  Piotr Kukielka Sep 7 '11 at 13:00
    
I don't think this solved the problem (it it existed). The problem is caused by the way you were linking and loading the shared libraries. You have just hidden the problem. Unfortunately the problem is related to the link and runtime load order. But without the exact commands you use to build the executable it is not dignosable and if you change the order the problem may re-surface. –  Loki Astari Sep 7 '11 at 13:25
    
I'm not using share libraries (.so) files at all, everything is statically linked. So I cannot have situation like in the example you gave me before. Not to mention that I didn't changed way of building the project nor added/deleted any files, so I don't see why problem should go away if it's not real fix. Changing 2 lines is enough to make it working... –  Piotr Kukielka Sep 7 '11 at 14:55

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