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I am developing an application and I would like to have my client class as clean as possible. I was thinking of using the mediator pattern (can be found on the following address) http://www.codeproject.com/KB/aspnet/SoftArch2.aspx

the problem is that my GUI can contain lots of controls and will require a lot of maintaining. Is it a good practice to have a reference of my client form in the mediator class for example:

class GuiMediatorObj
{

  private static mainForm _clientForm

  public GuiMediatorObj(mainForm parent)
  {
            _mainForm = parent;
  }

 public void print()
 {
     clientForm.TextBox1.Text = "some text;
 }

}

thanks

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1 Answer

Disclaimer: I havn't used the mediator pattern before. (at least not consciously)

But, from what it looks like i would think what you are proposing is no problem at all, i would even argue that it is better because it allows you to reuse the same mediator on similar forms and it removes even more code from the parent form itself. You can also think of it as "decorating" the form with new features. (see also decorator pattern)

Of course it also depends on the goal of the mediator, if you want to be able to quickly change between textboxes, then requiring every single control to be added manually to be better but if you are "adding features" to a generic form with certain properties and want to reuse it on several similar forms it would be better to take the whole form as input.

It would also depend on how well you are encapsulating your form in the first place. If all the child-controls are already private for some reason then making them public to access them in a mediator might be a bad idea.

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