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I have a hexadecimal MAC address held in a std::string. What would be the best way to turn that MAC address into an integer-type held in a uint64_t?

I'm aware of stringstream, sprintf, atoi, etc. I've actually written little conversion functions with the first 2 of those, but they seem more sloppy than I would like.

So, can someone show me a good, clean way to convert

std::string mac = "00:00:12:24:36:4f";

into a uint64_t?

PS: I don't have boost/TR1 facilities available and can't install them where the code will actually be used (which is also why I haven't copy pasted one of my attempts, sorry about that!). So please keep solutions to straight-up C/C++ calls. If you have an interesting solution with a UNIX system call I'd be interested too!

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+1. Surprised this hasn't come up before. What's the use case? Is it rare? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 6 '11 at 21:07
2  
I don't understand the link between not being able to use Boost/TR1 and not showing us your attempts. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 6 '11 at 21:07
    
Just dealing with a large network of devices and the MAC makes a good unique identifier given the scenario since its already in place. It's all XML powered, so I'm getting the values as human-readable text but one of the interfaces requires the MAC as a uint64_t (which is understandable). I was surprised it wasn't there too :p –  w00te Sep 6 '11 at 21:09
    
Suffice to say the attempts are on a computer system that I can't access from internet-enabled PCs :( –  w00te Sep 6 '11 at 21:09
2  
On SO we generally prefer fixing existing code to providing new code. rentacoder.com is just around the corner ;-) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 6 '11 at 21:13

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted
uint64_t string_to_mac(std::string const& s) {
    unsigned char a[6];
    int last = -1;
    int rc = sscanf(s.c_str(), "%hhx:%hhx:%hhx:%hhx:%hhx:%hhx%n",
                    a + 0, a + 1, a + 2, a + 3, a + 4, a + 5,
                    &last);
    if(rc != 6 || s.size() != last)
        throw std::runtime_error("invalid mac address format " + s);
    return
        uint64_t(a[0]) << 40 |
        uint64_t(a[1]) << 32 |
        uint64_t(a[2]) << 24 |
        uint64_t(a[3]) << 16 |
        uint64_t(a[4]) << 8 |
        uint64_t(a[5]);
}
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I can almost guarantee that someone will shout at you for providing a C-style solution for a C++ question... –  Oliver Charlesworth Sep 6 '11 at 21:32
    
This requires a specific format of MAC address, which may or may not be a problem. –  Mooing Duck Sep 6 '11 at 21:37
    
Hey, if its fast then I'm happy regardless of the type of solution. I'm just gonna sit around and see what other people like best before I select any answers. –  w00te Sep 6 '11 at 21:39
    
I don't think uint64_t(x) is a valid C-syntax. And those people can replace sscanf with std::sscanf. ) –  Maxim Yegorushkin Sep 6 '11 at 21:40
    
@Maxim: std::string isn't valid C syntax either, nor is throw std::runtime_error(...). The solution isn't meant to be valid C, it just happens to use a function from the standard C library (which is included in the standard C++ library). –  Keith Thompson Sep 6 '11 at 21:46

Use sscanf:

std::string mac = "00:00:12:24:36:4f";
unsigned u[6];
int c=sscanf(mac.c_str(),"%x:%x:%x:%x:%x:%x",u,u+1,u+2,u+3,u+4,u+5);
if (c!=6) raise_error("input format error");
uint64_t r=0;
for (int i=0;i<6;i++) r=(r<<8)+u[i];
// or:  for (int i=0;i<6;i++) r=(r<<8)+u[5-i];
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What happens if you feed it with "abc:def:123:456:789"? –  Maxim Yegorushkin Sep 7 '11 at 7:19
    
u[i] is set to values >255. OP could check this if necessary and give a diagnostic. Unfortunately, %hhx doesn't catch this either, does it? –  Nordic Mainframe Sep 7 '11 at 8:09
    
sscanf() just silently ignores overflow ( –  Maxim Yegorushkin Sep 7 '11 at 9:12

I can't think of any magic tricks. Here's a random attempt that may or may not be better than what you've done. It's simplish, but I bet there's far faster solutions.

uint64_t mac2int(std::string s) {
    uint64_t r=0;
    std::string::iterator i;
    std::string::iterator end = s.end();

    for(i = s.begin; i != end; ++i) {
        char let = *i;
        if (let >= '0' && let <= '9') { 
            r = r*0xf + (let-'0');
        } else if (let >= 'a' && let <= 'f') { 
            r = r*0xf + (let-'a'+10);
        } else if (let >= 'A' && let <= 'F') { 
            r = r*0xf + (let-'A'+10);
        }
    } 
    return r;
}
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Unlike the other answers, mine also accepts "01-23-45-67-89-ab", "0123.4567.89ab" (both valid) and "HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO YOU". –  Mooing Duck Sep 6 '11 at 21:39
    
Strictly speaking, the characters 'a'..'f' and 'A'..'F' aren't guaranteed to have contiguous representations (the digits '0'..'9' are). In practice, it's not going to be a problem; even EBCDIC, which doesn't make the alphabet contiguous, does make 'a'..'f' and 'A'..'F' contiguous. –  Keith Thompson Sep 6 '11 at 21:49

This will just shift hex digits through until the string runs out, not caring about delimiters or total length. But it converts the input string to the desired uint64_t format.

#include <string>
#include <stdint.h>

uint64_t cvt(std::string &v)
{
    std::string::iterator i;
    std::string digits = "0123456789abcdefABCDEF";
    uint64_t result = 0;
    size_t pos = 0;

    i = v.begin();

    while (i != v.end())
    {
        // search for character in hex digits set
        pos = digits.find(*i);

        // if found in valid hex digits
        if (pos != std::string::npos)
        {
            // handle upper/lower case hex digit
            if (pos > 0xf)
            {
                pos -= 6;
            }

            // shift a nibble in
            result <<= 4;
            result |= pos;
        }

        ++i;
    }

    return result;
}
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I was about to criticize the speed of digits.find() but then remembered you have a fixed length of 16, which fits in the cache... That's plenty fast. –  Mooing Duck Sep 7 '11 at 19:04
    
If ultimate speed was the objective, a lookup table should replace the digits string. I would use a table of 256 uint8_t elements with the valid indices having a value below 16 and all others perhaps 0xff. –  Amardeep Sep 7 '11 at 22:42
    
Incidentally, I just remembered there is a standard function that performs the OP's exact operation directly. It is ether_aton(). –  Amardeep Sep 7 '11 at 22:48

Another faster version without calling library functions:

inline unsigned read_hex_byte(char const** beg, char const* end) {
    if(end - *beg < 2)
        throw std::invalid_argument("");
    unsigned hi = (*beg)[0], lo = (*beg)[1];
    *beg += 2;
    hi -= hi >= '0' && hi <= '9' ? '0' :
        hi >= 'a' && hi <= 'f' ? 'a' - 10 :
        hi >= 'A' && hi <= 'F' ? 'A' - 10 :
        throw std::invalid_argument("");
    lo -= lo >= '0' && lo <= '9' ? '0' :
        lo >= 'a' && lo <= 'f' ? 'a' - 10 :
        lo >= 'A' && lo <= 'F' ? 'A' - 10 :
        throw std::invalid_argument("");
    return hi << 4 | lo;
}

uint64_t string_to_mac2(std::string const& s) {
    char const *beg = s.data(), *end = beg + s.size();
    uint64_t r;
    try {
        r = read_hex_byte(&beg, end);
        beg += beg != end && ':' == *beg;
        r = r << 8 | read_hex_byte(&beg, end);
        beg += beg != end && ':' == *beg;
        r = r << 8 | read_hex_byte(&beg, end);
        beg += beg != end && ':' == *beg;
        r = r << 8 | read_hex_byte(&beg, end);
        beg += beg != end && ':' == *beg;
        r = r << 8 | read_hex_byte(&beg, end);
        beg += beg != end && ':' == *beg;
        r = r << 8 | read_hex_byte(&beg, end);
    } catch(std::invalid_argument&) {
        beg = end - 1;
    }
    if(beg != end)
        throw std::runtime_error("invalid mac address format " + s);
    return r;
}
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My 2 cents:

uint64_t ParseMac(const std::string& str)
{
  std::istringstream iss(str);
  uint64_t nibble;
  uint64_t result(0);
  iss >> std::hex;
  while(iss >> nibble) {
    result = (result << 8) + nibble;
    iss.get();
  }
  return result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This looks interesting, +1 :) –  w00te Sep 6 '11 at 21:39
    
huh, clever use of iss.get(). –  Mooing Duck Sep 7 '11 at 19:02

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