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Considering :

list= {{{{21, 22}, 283}, {{26, 13}, 28}, {{32, 17}, 531}, {{31, 11}, 
187}, {{30, 9}, 154}, {{25, 12}, 377}, {{12, 16}, 
285}}, {{{20, 19}, 183}, {{11, 23}, 249}, {{18, 21}, 
174}, {{12, 21}, 513}, {{24, 23}, 233}, {{29, 20}, 
465}}, {{{18, 20}, 136}, {{13, 23}, 244}, {{19, 21}, 
228}, {{14, 16}, 453}, {{14, 22}, 201}, {{18, 22}, 
417}, {{10, 22}, 217}, {{17, 23}, 180}}, {{{22, 20}, 
123}, {{25, 17}, 210}, {{28, 10}, 536}, {{27, 13}, 
296}, {{19, 11}, 391}, {{23, 18}, 305}, {{24, 18}, 204}}}


Length /@ list

{7, 6, 8, 7}

Question is :

How could I select the sublist with a length > 7 for example. I have been trying a lot of Position / Select unsuccessfully :-(

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted
Select[list, Length@# > 7 &]  

Edit

When in doubt, you can test how the criteria is evaluating its argument. For example:

Select[{a, b, c}, Print]

Or a little bit more on the classical path:

Reap@Select[{a, b, c}, Sow]

Thanks to Brett for his suggestion in the comments below

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Thank You ! I was close : Select[flipSUB[[1, 1, 4, All]], Length /@ # > 3 &] , flipSUB[[1, 1, 4, All]] being list. Could you explain me why I did not need to use /@ to access the nested level ? I am sorry I am still confused on what is level 1 :-) –  500 Sep 6 '11 at 22:41
    
@500 Because Select performs the Map by itself. As per the Help: Select[list,crit] picks out all elements Subscript[e, i] of list for which crit[Subscript[e, i]] is True. –  belisarius Sep 6 '11 at 22:49
    
"Select performs the Map by itself." Thank you very much, this is Crystal clear to me. –  500 Sep 6 '11 at 23:00
1  
You could just use Print instead of Print@# &. (I do this fairly often for things like ColorFunction -> Print where I'd otherwise have to parenthesize the pure function due to the precedences of Rule and Function.) –  Brett Champion Sep 7 '11 at 3:18
    
@Brett You're right, of course. Thanks. –  belisarius Sep 7 '11 at 3:22
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Look in all levels using Cases, with a pattern that only matches lists of length bigger than 7.

In[426]:= Cases[list, aa_List /; Length[aa] > 7, Infinity]

Out[426]= {{{{18, 20}, 136}, {{13, 23}, 244}, {{19, 21}, 
   228}, {{14, 16}, 453}, {{14, 22}, 201}, {{18, 22}, 417}, {{10, 22},
    217}, {{17, 23}, 180}}}

--- edit ---

Sorry, I misunderstood. Can do as above, without that third argument (the Infinity). Result is the same in this case though.

--- end edit ---

Daniel Lichtblau

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Daniel, I am sorry, I am sorry, I can`t express myself correctly in terms of levels at which I want to apply something. Thank you for your attention –  500 Sep 6 '11 at 23:13
    
@500 Not to worry, the question was clear enough. I simply looked too fast. –  Daniel Lichtblau Sep 6 '11 at 23:24
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Some other variations:

Cases[list,_?(Length[#]>7&)]

If[Length[#]>7,#]&/@list/.Null->Sequence[]

(x\[Function]Replace[x,x_?(Length[#]<=7&)->Sequence[]])/@list
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Thank You Chris ! –  500 Sep 10 '11 at 12:06
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