Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to add a dash to a string, if there any characters after those digits, how would I do this with regex?

Examples:

dpa3455ad = dpa3455-ad

4545fd = 4545-fd
share|improve this question
    
What do you mean by "character"? A non-whitespace, non-digit? A letter? Please specify exactly. –  Ray Toal Sep 7 '11 at 0:14
    
Sorry, I didn't get it. So you want to be able to add a dash at the end of all numbers in a string or after a particular set of numbers? –  Shirlz Sep 7 '11 at 0:15
    
@Shirlz, Yes, that's what I want. –  Shimmy Sep 7 '11 at 0:20
    
@Shimmy - I have added C# code in my answer. –  manojlds Sep 7 '11 at 0:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use this regex: ( asssuming you want to add a dash at the first point of occurence of a non-digit after a set of digits)

(\d+)(\D.*)$

and replace with $1-$2

C# code:

Regex re = new Regex(@"(\d+)(\D.*)$");
Console.WriteLine(re.Replace("dpa3455ad", "$1-$2"));

Will give - dpa3455-ad

To keep it simple and insert a - at every occurence of a a non-digit following a digit, use this:

Regex re = new Regex(@"(\d)(\D)");
Console.WriteLine(re.Replace("dpa3455ad1s", "$1-$2"));

Will give - dpa3455-ad1-s

share|improve this answer
    
Result: -dfm1040a –  Shimmy Sep 7 '11 at 0:27
    
@Shimmy - Shucks, updated the regex. Try it now. –  manojlds Sep 7 '11 at 0:29
    
Why are you using +? instead of just +? –  NullUserException Sep 7 '11 at 0:37
    
@NullUserException - Good question, they will not have any difference in this situation –  manojlds Sep 7 '11 at 0:42
    
It does make a difference. This makes the engine backtrack unnecessarily. –  NullUserException Sep 7 '11 at 0:43

Edit: slashes should be dollars for .Net.

Replace:

([0-9])([^0-9])

with:

$1-$2

The search string looks for a digit [0-9] followed by a non-digit [^0-9], and records each as individual tokens (...). The replace string places a hyphen - between the two tokens $1 and $2.

share|improve this answer
    
According to this, wouldn't it just be Replace(/([0-9])([^0-9])/, /1-/2)? –  Nightfirecat Sep 7 '11 at 0:21
    
Nope, doesn't work, would you please show me the .NET code how to do it? I used the Regex.Replace function. –  Shimmy Sep 7 '11 at 0:22
    
I'm talking about .NET, not JS, I this its' different. –  Shimmy Sep 7 '11 at 0:23
    
Sorry, I had my slashes backwards. –  Hand-E-Food Sep 7 '11 at 0:25
    
Result: dfm104\1-\2 or dfm104/1-/2 –  Shimmy Sep 7 '11 at 0:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.