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I have a database table which contains an ID column and a Name column. I am tasked with designing a program that accepts one of the IDs as an argument to Main().

Bold is edit 2

I need to use that ID which must exist in the database, to correspond to some code to run. Each row in the table corresponds to slightly different code, but a lot of them share a lot of code. I need a design that will minimize code duplication.

So far what I've developed is an abstract base class that has an abstract Int32 field ID to enforce derived classes having their corresponding ID in the database. That way I can reflect over the derived classes to find the one whose ID matches the Main() argument and instantiate that class. Then I just call the virtual methods from Main() which runs the most derived code that has been defined.

public abstract class Base {
    public abstract Int32 Id { get; }    
    public void Foo() {
        // Do something
    }
}

public class Derived {
    public override Int32 Id { get { return 42; } } 
    public void Foo() {
        // Do something more specific
    }
}

Does anyone have any better ideas how to achieve what I want? I like the idea of keeping the ID right in the class definition, but I'm open to changing that if it makes sense.

Thanks!

EDIT:

One thing I don't like about this is that I have to reflect over each derived type and instantiate that type to check the ID. Does anyone have a better idea on how to do that?

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Is this homework? –  Xint0 Sep 7 '11 at 2:13
    
No, it's for a new automation engine at work. –  Nick Strupat Sep 7 '11 at 2:17
    
if you look up the name by the id from the db, what do you do with the name. It sounds like your looking up and keying the code by the id ... why look up the name? –  bryanmac Sep 7 '11 at 2:22
1  
You can use Attributes to handle your edit - call GetCustomAttributes on the type and then you don't need to instantiate the type itself. –  Ian Mercer Sep 7 '11 at 2:27
1  
That's a great idea. Is there a way to enforce that a child class must be decorated with that attribute? –  Nick Strupat Sep 7 '11 at 2:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Instead of using a property to define the ID of the class, use a custom attribute. That way, you don't have to instantiate the object to check what its ID is.

When your program runs, it can scan the assembly for all classes with that attribute tag, and find the one with the matching ID, instantiate that class, and then run it's Foo method. If you perform this kind of lookup multiple times per application run, you could instatiate all the classes with your custom attribute and then put them into a Dictionary to provide quick lookups by ID.

Your code might look something like this:

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Class)]
public class CommandAttribute {
    public CommandAttribute(int id) {
        ID = id;
    }

    public int ID { get; private set; }
}

public abstract class Command {
    public abstract void Execute();
}

[Command(2)]
public class MyCommand : Command {
    public override void Execute() {
        //Do something useful
    }
}

The other advantage of using a custom attribute is that you have to explicitly tag everything that is a candidate for being instantiated and executed by ID, rather than assuming than anything derived from your base class is a candidate. If you are sharing code between the classes, you might want to make a common base class for them that derives from your base class, but should not be instantiated or executed on its own.

One thing I don't understand is, what is the point of the "Name" field if the class you want to run is identified by the ID? If you can decide what the name of each ID is, then you could use the name field as the fully qualified type name of the class you want to execute, which then avoid having to scan through all the types in your assembly (or application domain, depending upon the scope of your search). That setup is a bit more prone to typos, however.

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Thank you for the suggestion of using attributes. I definitely overlooked that idea! Unfortunately I can't change the structure nor the data in the database and the Name column contains unclean data. –  Nick Strupat Sep 7 '11 at 2:40
    
Do you know if there is a way to enforce that a derived class must have an attribute? –  Nick Strupat Sep 7 '11 at 2:40
    
Not natively in C#. You could create your own post-compilation step that analyzes the output assembly and raise an error if those constraints aren't met, but I would argue that in practice it likely wont be an issue. Furthermore, you gain added flexibility by forcing all the classes that are candidates for execution by ID to be tagged with an attribute, rather than relying on the assumption that all classes derived from your base "Command" class can be executed this way (some may exist solely to be used as a base class for other command classes, and are not intended to be executed by ID). –  Nimrand Sep 7 '11 at 3:05
    
In regards to Xint0's answer, you could very well use this solution within the factory pattern. In this case, the factory is just implemented by reflecting on the assembly, finding the class with the proper attribute and ID, and instantiating it. –  Nimrand Sep 7 '11 at 13:24

It sounds like you need to implement a factory pattern.

I would define an interface:

public interface IWidget
{
    void Foo();
}

Then the base class:

public abstract class WidgetBase : IWidget
{
    public void Foo()
    {
        this.Bar()
    }

    protected virtual void Bar()
    {
        // Base implementation
    }
}

The factory:

public static WidgetFactory
{
    public static IWidget Create(int id)
    {
        // Get class name from id, probably use the name in your database.
        // Get Type from class name
        // Get constructor for Type
        // Create instance using constructor and return it.
    }
}

A derived class:

public class DerivedWidget : WidgetBase
{
    protected override void Bar()
    {
        // call base implementation
        base.Bar();
        // derived implementation
    }
}

In your main:

public void Main(int id)
{
    var widget = WidgetBase.Create(id);
    widget.Foo();
}
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Single responsibility principle! Why is the factory implementation inside WidgetBase?! –  Domenic Sep 7 '11 at 2:55

I like @Xint0's idea of using a Factory for this kind of task, but I thought I'd still contribute another answer.

A better way to implement your original design would be to pass the ID to the base constructor as follows:

public abstract class Base {
    public Int32 Id { get; private set; }
    protected Base(Int32 id) {
            this.Id = id;
    }
    public void Foo() {
        // Do something
    }
}

public class Derived : Base {
    public Derived : base(42) {}
    public void Foo() {
        // Do something more specific
    }
}
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