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I was trying to solve random coding kata's and found this one, my question here is what is the optimal algorithm and best design approach for solving this kata?

Given a sequence of numbers, determine the type of sequence, calculate and return the next number in the sequence.

Integer guessNextNumber(List<Integer> sequence);

The given sequence can be one of two types, arithmetic sequence and geometric sequence.

Arithmetic sequence is defined as: Arith_seq(p,q) = p, p+q, (p+q) +q, … Example: Arith_seq(7,3) = 7, 10, 13, 16, 19, …

Geometric sequence is defined as: Geo_seq(p,q) = p, p*q, (p*q) * q, … Example: Geo_seq(2,3) = 2, 6, 18, 54, …

Expected input and output: The input sequence will have at least 3 numbers. For the input sequence (7, 10, 13, 16, 19), the return value would be 22. For the input sequence (2, 6, 18, 54), the return value would be 162.

Algorithm:

  1. Check input sequence if we have sequence as (a, b, c) then,
  2. if difference between elements of sequence (b-a) or (c-b) is equal then its Arithmatic Sequence.

  3. if division between elements of sequence is equal, eg: b/a and c/b then its Geometric Sequence

My question what would be an optimal algo for solving it?

Update: Is it possible to solve this constant run time?

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What have you tried? What specific questions do you have? If you don't have Java code, feel free to post pseudo-code or a description of what you think the algorithm might be. –  S.Lott Sep 7 '11 at 2:33
4  
This seems trivial. Am I missing something? –  Beta Sep 7 '11 at 2:33
    
@S.Lott - What I am thinking is not optimal solutions and so want to see what community thinks about it. –  Rachel Sep 7 '11 at 2:40
    
@Beta - I want to figure out a way of finding pattern in Geometric sequence based on which I differentiate the input sequence and predict next number in the sequence. –  Rachel Sep 7 '11 at 2:45
1  
@Rachel: "not optimal" doesn't help us understand what you're thinking or what you think is wrong with what your thinking. It tells us nothing. Please post your not optimal algorithm. –  S.Lott Sep 7 '11 at 9:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Lets say your collection is a,b,c,d

  • b - a + b = c then it is arithmetic
  • b / a * b = c it is geometric

To return the right sequence you could thus do

  • d - c + d = e and if e - d = d - c return e
  • else
  • d / c * d = e and if e / d = d / c return e

Java would be (assuming it is either artihmetic or geometric, never anything else, and always atleast 3 entries)

public int nextInt(int[] s){
  if( s[1] - s[0] == s[2] - s[1] ) return ( s[1] - s[0] ) + s[s.length - 1];
  return ( s[1] / s[0] ) * s[s.length - 1];
}

Safe code would be

public int nextInt(int[] s){
  if(s!=null && s.length > 3){
    if( s[1] - s[0] == s[2] - s[1] ) return ( s[1] - s[0] ) + s[s.length - 1];
    if( s[1] / s[0] == s[2] / s[1] ) return ( s[1] / s[0] ) * s[s.length - 1];
  }
  return -1;
}

With List instead of Array

public Integer guessNextNumber(List<Integer> sequence){
  if( sequence.get(1) - sequence.get(0) == sequence.get(2) - sequence.get(1) ) return (    sequence.get(1) -  sequence.get(0) ) +  sequence.get(sequence.size() - 1);
  return ( sequence.get(1) / sequence.get(0) ) * sequence.get(sequence.size() - 1);
}
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can you solve this in constant run time? –  Rachel Sep 7 '11 at 3:07
    
This is constant run time. (If the list can be indexed into in constant time or has a constant-time size method.) –  Rex Kerr Sep 7 '11 at 3:10
1  
if you replace d and c by the last and second to last entry of your sequence it will have the same runtime regardless of the sequence size –  Benjamin Udink ten Cate Sep 7 '11 at 3:26
    
added abit of javacode to my answer, complexity of the first line would be 13 and of second line 6. To optimize for memory you might want to use the last 3 values of your array instead of the first 3 I think. then again this would add to the complexity because for each lookup a substraction of .length - n has to be made –  Benjamin Udink ten Cate Sep 7 '11 at 4:41
    
@Benjamin - With your function, we are accepting int[] but actually we need Integer guessNextNumber(List<Integer> sequence); and I believe is there an easy way to do conversion? –  Rachel Sep 8 '11 at 4:21

The question as it stands is simple: find the differences between the first three numbers of the sequence and compare. If they are equal, the sequence is arithmetic. If they are not, the sequence is geometric.

Consider the arithmetic sequence 5, 2.

5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15.

Consider the geometric sequence 5, 2.

5, 10, 20, 40.

The differences between the numbers in the first sequence: 2. The differences between the numbers in the second sequence: 5, 10, 20.

Once you've determined whether the sequence is geometric or arithmetic, simply use the difference to predict the next number in the case of an arithmetic sequence, or divide the second number in the sequence by the first and multiply the last by the quotient in order to find the next number.

def determineProgression(xs: List[Int]): String = {
    assert(xs.length >= 3, "The list must be at least three elements long.")

    if ((xs(1) - xs(0)) == (xs(2) - xs(1)))
        "This is an arithmetic sequence. The most likely next step is " + (xs.last + (xs(1) - xs(0)))
    else if ((xs(1) / xs(0)) == (xs(2) / xs(1)))
        "This is a geometric sequence. The most likely next step is " + (xs.last * (xs(2) / xs(1)))
    else "This sequence is neither arithmetic nor geometric."
}
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1  
your second assumptions is not correct, if difference is not equal then we cannot say that sequence is geometric. –  Rachel Sep 7 '11 at 2:38
    
You defined the arithmetic sequence as p, p + q, (p + q) + q, ... If this continues, the difference will be q at each step. As you defined the geometric sequence, it is p, pq, pq * q, ... If this continues, the difference will grow at each step. In fact, this is the very definition of an arithmetic progression versus a geometric progression: arithmetic progressions grow by a constant at each step, while geometric progressions grow by a constant ratio. –  syrion Sep 7 '11 at 2:48
1  
@Rachel - "The given sequence can be one of two types, arithmetic sequence and geometric sequence." Therefore, if the difference is not equal (i.e. not arithmetic sequence), then we can say that the sequence is geometric. –  mbeckish Sep 7 '11 at 3:00
    
@mbeckish - agreed :) –  Rachel Sep 7 '11 at 3:06
    
@syrion - can you optimize approach to run in constant time? –  Rachel Sep 7 '11 at 3:06

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