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I have function that receives an array of pointers like so:

void foo(int *ptrs[], int num, int size)
{ 
  /* The body is an example only  */
     for (int i = 0; i < size; ++i) { 
       for (int j = 0; j < num-1; ++j)
         ptrs[num-1][i] += ptrs[j][i];
     }
}

What I want to convey to the compiler is that the pointers ptrs[i] are not aliases of each other and that the arrays ptrs[i] do not overlap. How shall I do this ? My ulterior motive is to encourage automatic vectorization.

Also, is there a way to get the same effect as __restrict__ on an iterator of a std::vector ?

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2  
StackOverflow should really allow accepting multiple answers. –  san Sep 7 '11 at 3:28
1  
Important note: The C++ standard does NOT support the restrict qualifier from C99 -- its not even a keyword. So any use of restrict in a C++ program is relying on an implementation extension –  Chris Dodd Aug 2 '12 at 20:25
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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

restrict, unlike the more common const, is a property of the pointer rather than the data pointed to. It therefore belongs on the right side of the '*' declarator-modifier. [] in a parameter declaration is another way to write *. Putting these things together, you should be able to get the effect you want with this function prototype:

void foo(int *restrict *restrict ptrs, int num, int size)
{
   /* body */
}

and no need for new names. (Not tested. Your mileage may vary. restrict is a pure optimization hint and may not actually do anything constructive with your compiler.)

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2  
Unless I'm mistaken, one of those "restrict" declarations is superfluous; there are no other "int **"-type variables around with which aliasing could occur. "int * restrict * ptrs" should do the job. And I wonder if "int * restrict ptrs[]" might do it also... –  davmac Sep 7 '11 at 4:27
    
IMHO both restricts are necessary, since other pointers might otherwise exist outside of the scope of foo. –  Johan Bezem Nov 5 '11 at 16:40
    
"What I want to convey to the compiler is that the pointers ... are not aliases of each other" –  davmac Mar 15 '12 at 17:45
    
Also, late comment, but semantics of pointers "outside of the scope of foo" are not affected by restrict qualifiers on parameters of foo. The second restrict is NOT necessary. –  davmac Apr 25 at 8:19
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Something like:

void foo(int *ptrs[], int num, int size)
{ 
  /* The body is an example only  */
     for (int i = 0; i < size; ++i) { 
       for (int j = 0; j < num-1; ++j) {
         int * restrict a = ptrs[num-1];
         int * restrict b = ptrs[j];
         a[i] += b[i];
     }
}

... should do it, I think, in C99. I don't think there's any way in C++, but many C++ compilers also support restrict.

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Ah I see, I have to introduce new names. Thanks. –  san Sep 7 '11 at 3:14
1  
By the way, you can use a similar trick to mark the object reference by an iterator as unaliased (i.e. assign its address to a restricted pointer). –  davmac Sep 7 '11 at 3:17
1  
You've got the 'restrict' qualifiers on the wrong side of the '*'s here. –  Zack Sep 7 '11 at 3:19
    
@davmac Do you mean something like __restrict__ ptr = & (*iter) ? Seems it will work, nice. Thanks. –  san Sep 7 '11 at 3:24
    
@Zack, thanks, I've corrected it now. –  davmac Sep 7 '11 at 4:16
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In C++, pointer arguments are assumed not to alias if they point to fundamentally different types ("strict aliasing" rules).

In C99, the "restrict" keyword specifies that a pointer argument does not alias any other pointer argument.

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1  
Pretty sure strict aliasing rules apply in c as well as c++. stackoverflow.com/questions/98650/… –  Darren Engwirda Sep 7 '11 at 3:20
    
@Darren Thanks, good to learn. –  Mu Qiao Sep 7 '11 at 3:24
1  
Yes, yes they do. Also, this answer does not tell the OP anything he or she did not already know. –  Zack Sep 7 '11 at 3:25
1  
The strict aliasing rules are more efficient in C++, because the parameters tend to be std::vector<int>& and not int*. –  Bo Persson Sep 7 '11 at 6:43
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