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I am using Ruby on Rails 3.0.10 and I would like to build an hash key\value pairs in a conditional way. That is, I would like to add a key and its related value if a condition is matched:

hash = {
  :key1 => value1,
  :key2 => value2, # This key2\value2 pair should be added only 'if condition' is 'true'
  :key3 => value3,
  ...
}

How can I do that and keep a "good" readability for the code? Am I "forced" to use the merge method?

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Where do the keys and values come from? A different hash? –  Ray Toal Sep 7 '11 at 3:47
    
@Ray Toal - No from a different hash. I am building an hash from scratch. –  Backo Sep 7 '11 at 3:51
2  
I'm sorry I don't understand. The data has to come from somewhere: a string, another hash, an array, or someplace else. Even if you "build the hash from scratch" you have to have the data. Writing conditional insertions in a hash literal isn't done in Ruby; you can delete after the fact using Chris Jester-Young's technique. –  Ray Toal Sep 7 '11 at 4:05
    
is there just one condition that controls all the conditional values? –  Martin DeMello Sep 7 '11 at 5:46
1  
@backo you mean there's exactly one conditional value in the entire hash? if so i'd just say insert it at the end –  Martin DeMello Sep 7 '11 at 5:56
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8 Answers 8

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I prefer tap, as I think it provides a cleaner solution than the ones described here by not requiring any hacky deleting of elements and by clearly defining the scope in which the hash is being built.

It also means you don't need to declare an unnecessary local variable, which I always hate.

In case you haven't come across it before, tap is very simple - it's a method on Object that accepts a block and always returns the object it was called on. So to build up a hash conditionally you could do this:

Hash.new.tap do |my_hash|
  my_hash[:x] = 1 if condition_1
  my_hash[:y] = 2 if condition_2
  ...
end

There are many interesting uses for tap, this is just one.

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Is the assignment missing? hash = Hash.new.tap do ... –  tokland Feb 4 at 10:10
    
It depends if you want to assign it to anything. For me, typically, this is more than enough for a method to do by itself, so this would just be the entire body of the method - no need to assign it to anything. –  Russell Feb 5 at 18:38
    
thanks, this works ) –  rusllonrails Jun 5 at 12:48
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Probably best to keep it simple if you're concerned about readability:

hsh = {}
hsh[:key1] = value1
hsh[:key2] = value2 if condition?
hsh[:key3] = value3
...
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In this case an imperative approach is the most "simple", but if you prefer a functional approach:

h = {
  :key1 => 1,
  :key2 => (2 if condition),
  :key3 => 3,
}.reject { |k, v| v.nil? }

You can abstract Hash#reject { |k, v| v.nil? } as Hash#compact_by_value if you plan to use this pattern often.

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First build your hash thusly:

hash = {
  :key1 => value1,
  :key2 => condition ? value2 : :delete_me,
  :key3 => value3
}

Then do this after building your hash:

hash.delete_if {|_, v| v == :delete_me}

Unless your hash is frozen or otherwise immutable, this would effectively only keep values that are present.

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I must build an hash from scratch. –  Backo Sep 7 '11 at 3:47
    
@Backo: Correct. Build your hash (with both present and blank values), then run that delete_if line to nuke off the blank ones. –  Chris Jester-Young Sep 7 '11 at 3:47
    
Correct. The condition is not run on the 'value' itself but on an "external" method. I updated the question. –  Backo Sep 7 '11 at 3:49
    
@Backo: Updated post accordingly. –  Chris Jester-Young Sep 7 '11 at 3:51
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IF you build hash from some kind of Enumerable data, you can use inject, for example:

raw_data.inject({}){ |a,e| a[e.name] = e.value if expr; a }
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Keep it simple:

hash = {
  :key1 => value1,
  :key3 => value3,
  ...
}
hash[:key2]=value2 if condition

This way you also visually separate your special case, which might get unnoticed if it is buried within hash literal assignment.

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Same idea as Chris Jester-Young, with a slight readability trick

def cond(x)
  condition ? x : :delete_me
end

hash = {
  :key1 => value1,
  :key2 => cond(value2),
  :key3 => value3
}

and then postprocess to remove the :delete_me entries

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Using fetch can be useful if you're populating a hash from optional attributes somewhere else. Look at this example:

def create_watchable_data(attrs = {})
  return WatchableData.new({
    id:             attrs.fetch(:id, '/catalog/titles/breaking_bad_2_737'),
    titles:         attrs.fetch(:titles, ['737']),
    url:            attrs.fetch(:url, 'http://www.netflix.com/shows/breaking_bad/3423432'),
    year:           attrs.fetch(:year, '1993'),
    watchable_type: attrs.fetch(:watchable_type, 'Show'),
    season_title:   attrs.fetch(:season_title, 'Season 2'),
    show_title:     attrs.fetch(:id, 'Breaking Bad')
  })
end
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