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Say I have two entities like so:

public class Response 
{
  public int Id { get; set; }
  public int PatientId { get; set; }
  public virtual Patient Patient { get; set; }
  public string Text { get; set; }
}

public class Patient
{
  public int Id { get; set; }
  public string Name { get; set; }
  public virtual ICollection<Response> Responses { get; set; }
}

I want to be able to call

Patient.Responses.Remove(someResponse);

And have entity delete not only the relationship but the Response entity as well. At present if I just delete the relationship I get the following error:

System.InvalidOperationException: The operation failed: The relationship could not be changed because one or more of the foreign-key properties is non-nullable. When a change is made to a relationship, the related foreign-key property is set to a null value. If the foreign-key does not support null values, a new relationship must be defined, the foreign-key property must be assigned another non-null value, or the unrelated object must be deleted.

Reading this blog post http://blogs.msdn.com/b/dsimmons/archive/2010/01/31/deleting-foreign-key-relationships-in-ef4.aspx I realised I can achieve this by having the following mapping:

modelBuilder.Entity<Response>().HasKey(m => new { m.Id, m.PatientId }); 

But I don't want to change my primary key. What I want to do is override DbContext.SaveChanges() and mark for deletion any Responses where the Patient relationship has been deleted. I tried this:

public override int SaveChanges()
{
  // Need to manually delete all responses that have been removed from the patient, otherwise they'll be orphaned.
  var orphanedResponses = ChangeTracker.Entries().Where(
    e => e.State == EntityState.Modified &&
      e.Entity is Response &&
        e.Reference("Patient").CurrentValue == null);
  foreach (var orphanedResponse in orphanedResponses)
  {
    Responses.Remove(orphanedResponse.Entity as Response);
  }

  return base.SaveChanges();
}

But I found it's possible to attach a Response with only Response.PatientId set and not Response.Patient, entity wont have loaded the Response.Patient property so my code thinks it's been orphaned and should be deleted.

In summary

What I want to know is how can I can tell that an entity has been modified because it's FK relationship has been removed.

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3 Answers 3

Use this instead:

public override int SaveChanges()
{
    var responses = Responses.Local.Where(r => r.Patient == null);
    foreach (var response in responses.ToList())
    {
        Responses.Remove(response);
    }

    return base.SaveChanges();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this Ladislav, it is another way to achieve what I was doing. This will remove all responses that are being tracked regardless of if they are added or modified, could it be possible that an added entity would have the Response.PatientId set but not Response.Patient property? Wouldn't entity then populate the Patient property for you and in that case you are removing a valid entry? I'm just guessing here. –  Paul Heasley Sep 9 '11 at 1:24
    
Update: After implementing this version some time ago, the other day I had to track down a performance issue and realised this was the cause. Responses.Local can grow massive if you're adding lots of records and saving them away one at a time. I've now reverted to my original code using ChangeTracker. –  Paul Heasley Oct 1 '11 at 0:48

You need to configure the mappings such that a cascade delete will occur. To do that you need to map the model with WillCascadeOnDelete to true.

public class MyContext : DbContext
{
    protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        modelBuilder.Entity<Patient>()
           .HasMany(patient=> patient.Responses)
           .WithRequired(response => response.Patient)
           .HasForeignKey(response => response.PatientId)
           .WillCascadeOnDelete(true);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but cascade on delete will only delete the dependent when the parent is deleted right? I don't to delete the Patient, I just want to remove the Response from the Patient.Response and have entity delete the Response for me. –  Paul Heasley Sep 7 '11 at 22:15
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think my problem is not with the code but rather with how I assume entity's Attach() method works. I assumed that if I attach a response with PatientId set but not Patient property then entity would populate the Patient property for me.

In fact what I think happens is entity attaches it as it is, then if I mark that entity as modified and save it, entity sees the null Patient property and assumes I want to remove the relationship, so throws an error because it would be orphaned (can't null Response.PatientId). So perhaps everything is working as designed and my SaveChanges() solution works.

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