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On execution of following line :

    System.out.println(null);

the result comes out to be null printed on console.

Why does that happen?

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2  
-1 - This question is answered by reading the javadoc. –  Stephen C Sep 7 '11 at 5:15
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5 Answers

It prints null because that's how it's specified. Look at the print API documentation. (Or here for a more recent (1.4.2) API - the description is the same in the version 7 JavaDocs.)

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Telling from the sources of OpenJDK 1.6.0_22:

PrintStream:

public void println(Object x) {
    String s = String.valueOf(x);
    synchronized (this) {
        print(s);
        newLine();
    }
}

String:

public static String valueOf(Object obj) {
    return (obj == null) ? "null" : obj.toString();
}
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Because that's exactly what the Javadocs say will happen?

http://download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/io/PrintStream.html#print(java.lang.String)

Prints a string. If the argument is null then the string "null" is printed.

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When I look at the javadoc for PrintStream http://download.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/api/java/io/PrintStream.html

i observe (i am quoting here) print

public void print(String s) Print a string. If the argument is null then the string "null" is printed. Otherwise, the string's characters are converted into bytes according to the platform's default character encoding, and these bytes are written in exactly the manner of the write(int) method. Parameters: s - The String to be printed

hopefully, that should answer your question..

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It's eventually calling String.valueOf(Object) which looks like:

public static String valueOf(Object obj) {
    return (obj == null) ? "null" : obj.toString();
}
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