Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Suppose we have three arrays a, b, and c:

int a[1000] = {3,1,5,4};
int b[1000] = {7,9,11,3};
char c[1000] = {'A','B','C','D'};

Array a is then sorted, so it becomes:

a == {1,3,4,5}

Is it possible to arrange for the other two arrays to have their elements rearranged by index, so that they mirror the placement of the sorted elements in the sorted array a? In this example, this should result in

b == {9,7,3,11}
c == {'B','A','D','C'}

How can I achieve this?

share|improve this question
    
Why x[1000] when just using 4 elements? –  Antonio Pérez Sep 7 '11 at 7:10
    
Not related, but you need to enclose your chars in 's: char c[1000] = {'A', 'B', 'C', 'D'} (unless they are char variables defined elsewhere) –  carlpett Sep 7 '11 at 7:11
    
oh yes, forgot that thanks –  zeulb Sep 7 '11 at 7:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

you can create a class ABC, which will hold 3 fields: int a, int b, char c.
implement the operator< for this class, and create a ABC[] of the approppriate size and populate it such that ABC[i] = ABC(a[i],b[i],c[i]).

implement the operator< so it will compare only a, and use sort on the ABC array.

after done sorting, you have all your elements in the desired order, just iterate the ABC array and populate the other arrays.

EDIT:

simplified [and hard coded] code sample:

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
using namespace std;

class ABC { 
public: 
  int a,b;
  char c;
  bool operator<(const ABC& other) const { 
    return a < other.a;
  }
};
int main() { 
  int a[4] = {3,1,5,4};
  int b[4] = {7,9,11,3};
  char c[4] = {'A','B','C','D'};
  ABC abc[4];
  for (int i = 0; i< 4; i++) { 
    abc[i].a = a[i];
    abc[i].b = b[i];
    abc[i].c = c[i];
  }
  sort(abc,abc+4);
  for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++) { 
    a[i] = abc[i].a;
    b[i] = abc[i].b;
    c[i] = abc[i].c;
  }
  cout << "a= [" << a[0] << ", " << a[1] << ", " << a[2] << ", " << a[3] << "]" << endl;
  cout << "b= [" << b[0] << ", " << b[1] << ", " << b[2] << ", " << b[3] << "]" << endl;
  cout << "c= [" << c[0] << ", " << c[1] << ", " << c[2] << ", " << c[3] << "]" << endl;
  return 0;
}

works good for me on codepad: http://codepad.org/eCyNkyqR

share|improve this answer
    
yes, this seems like a good option... –  c0da Sep 7 '11 at 7:16
    
can you show me code example, cause i am new so don't really understand that –  zeulb Sep 7 '11 at 7:49
    
@zeulb: I added a code sample –  amit Sep 7 '11 at 8:03

It's not exactly what you need, but you can achieve similar results by using std::map and std::sort:

std::map<int, std::pair<int, char> > someArray;
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.