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see in c language we can make comment by following two way

1>

/* this is one way */

2>

// this is 2nd way

what is the difference between two?
i mean does any one is better then another

or

both have same impact and no difference in compiling or processing at any platform.

Edit : specialy writing code for embedded

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I don't program in C, but I think some open source projects (such the MRI version of the Ruby interpreter) only allow the first way. If you're planning on contributing to them, you may as well get into the habit of fitting their preference. –  Andrew Grimm Sep 8 '11 at 5:49
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8 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

One (perhaps theoretical) reason not to use // comments is that they're not supported in C90. It's true that most, perhaps all, modern C compilers do support // comments, even if they don't support the rest of C99, but different compilers support different subsets of C99.

Any compiler that supports the C90 will reject // comments if you invoke it in a C90-conforming mode.

If you're fanatical about portability, and you want to ensure that your code will compile with any C compiler, then you should compile it in C90-conforming mode -- which means // comments will be rejected. You can enable extensions or partial (or even full) C99 conformance, but then you'll be enabling other C99 features as well -- and your compiler won't warn you about other C99-specific features that you might use accidentally.

For example, gcc supports both // comments and long long (as well as a number of other C99 features); enabling // comments in gcc disables diagnostics for long long.

But for most purposes, this probably isn't a good enough reason to avoid // comments. You can write reasonably portable code if you're aware of which features are C99-specific, which compilers support those features, and which compilers you care about supporting.

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this is what i relay want to know.. i have doubt that // is not supported in older version of c..thanks –  Mr.32 Sep 8 '11 at 7:46
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Technically, only the first way is guaranteed to work on all compilers, present and past. In practice, all C compilers implemented since the mid-1980s or so implement both ways, so unless you will be writing for a legacy compiler, you can do whichever way works best for you or your organization.

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2  
C++ style comments ( // ) were added to C in the C99 standard although many compilers have been allowing them much longer. –  Klas Lindbäck Sep 7 '11 at 9:35
1  
// comments are one of the few C99 language (non-library) features that MSVC supports when compiling in C mode. Actually, I wonder if it's the only one? –  Michael Burr Sep 7 '11 at 16:18
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Just use whichever is more convenient and natural. Short comments, a handful of words, at the end of a short line work well with //. Longer comments, spread over multiple lines, are perhaps better with the tradition /* ... */ style. Whatever, it all comes down to personal preference and your teams's coding standards.

It makes no difference to the compilation process.

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If you have the need to grep some code, you will have advantages with the single line comment used for every line even if you comment out a block (STRG + Shift + 7 in Eclipse). The grepped code where your search phrase was found is display WITH the //. The result cannot lead to misunderstandings becuase of not displayed multi line comment.

1 #define MY_COUNTER 42
2 if( MY_COUNTER == index )
3 {
4     tempVar = calcSomething();
5     doThis();
6 //    tempVar = MY_COUNTER;
7     doThat();
8 }

grep result:
1 #define MY_COUNTER 42
2 if( MY_COUNTER == index )
6 // tempVar = MY_COUNTER;

In the code above you directly see in the grep result (search for MY_COUNTER), line 8 is commented out.

1 #define MY_COUNTER 42
2 if( MY_COUNTER == index )
3 {
4     tempVar = calcSomething();
5     doThis();
6 /*    
7     tempVar = MY_COUNTER;
8 */
9     doThat();
8 }

Here you cannot see the commented out line:
1 #define MY_COUNTER 42
2 if( MY_COUNTER == index )
7 tempVar = MY_COUNTER;

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One reason to use // comments could be if you want to comment out a larger block of code that has comments inside. You can not do nested comments with /* */.

This will not compile:

/*

/*printf("foo");*/
printf("bar");

*/

But this is ok:

/*

//printf("foo");
printf("bar");

*/
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Just as you said: both have same impact and no difference in compiling or processing at any platform.

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  1. This is a way to easily create multiline comments
  2. You can only comment per line using this way of commenting.

Which one is better is really a matter of personal preference, for comments spanning multiple lines, I'd use the first, but this my personal preference.

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/* this is one way */

mostly use this for block comment and

//

for single line.

As in case of which one is better .

//

this one is guaranteed to work on any compiler.

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No, the 2nd example (double slash) will not work on any compiler as it was not supported originally (as Wallyk says in one of the other answers) –  fluffyben Sep 13 '11 at 20:19
    
thanx for correction –  Sameer Surjikar Sep 21 '11 at 8:56
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