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Below is a simplified example of what I want to do. In the actual code I catch exceptions to do other things. But essentially I would like to wrap the 'Convert' class in a generic function, but alas this code generates an error saying that it cannot implicitly convert from type 'ushort' to 'T'.

Any ideas gratefully received. (It's my first question so go gentle with me!)

    private T ChangeValue<T>(T value, string x)
    {
        if (typeof(UInt16) == typeof(T))
        {
            value = Convert.ToUInt16(x);
        }
        return value;
    }
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Another question (out of interest) is why don't the Convert and BitConverter classes use generics anyway??? –  wittybear Sep 7 '11 at 9:45
    
Why do you want something generic when you only handling uint16? –  Jan Christian Selke Sep 7 '11 at 9:46
1  
Generics were introduced in C# 2.0/.NET 2.0. The Convert class existed before that. –  dtb Sep 7 '11 at 9:46
    
Its just a sample - I handle about 4 other types too. –  wittybear Sep 7 '11 at 9:46
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Are you looking for something like this?

private T ChangeType<T>(object value)
{
    return (T)Convert.ChangeType(value, typeof(T));
}

Usage:

double result = ChangeType<double>(true);
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This is looking good - I need to go and test it in my development environment... be back soon! –  wittybear Sep 7 '11 at 9:55
    
Brilliant! Thanks! –  wittybear Sep 7 '11 at 10:12
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