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If I have the given below classes:

class TestA
{
    public:
        const TestA &operator=(const int A){return *this;}
};

class TestB : public TestA
{
    public:
        //Inheritance?
};

The question presumes both class TestA and class TestB have exactly the same contents in terms of variables: Is the assignment operator (or any other operator) inherited?

Is the following valid?

class TestB : public TestA
{
    public:
        using TestA::operator=;
        //Inheritance?
};

If it is valid, would it make a difference?

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Just as a note: operator= should return a non-const reference to this –  king_nak Sep 7 '11 at 10:56
    
@king_nak It can return whatever it wants -- even void (however if you want to chain assignment operations as in a = b = c it should return non-const reference). –  Alexander Poluektov Sep 7 '11 at 11:08
    
@Alex If it has to take a const, returning const would make no difference to chain as it's right to left. –  SSight3 Sep 7 '11 at 11:48
    
@Alex & Sight As overloaded operators should behave like on POD, the return value should be a non-const reference. Chaining will work with a const reference, but not the statement (a = b) = c;, which works on POD. But that's a very special case... –  king_nak Sep 7 '11 at 12:18
    
@king_nak "Morally" it should behave like on POD, by "legally" it can return anything. I'm talking about "legality" issue. From "morality" perspective it should also accept not int but const ref parameter. –  Alexander Poluektov Sep 7 '11 at 12:20

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Assignment operators are hidden by derived class by default (as compiler always generates a T& operator = () for any class T, if not specified). Which makes the inherited operator = not usable.

Yes when you specify them with using keyword; they become usable. Demo. So your code snippet does make sense.

public: using TestA::operator=;
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1  
The methods specified with using have the visibility of where you put the using. So if it's before the public:, they're private... With this you can change the visibility of inherited methods –  king_nak Sep 7 '11 at 10:43
1  
This is what I was hoping for! Thank you iammilind! –  SSight3 Sep 7 '11 at 10:45
    
@king_nak, yes you are correct. I was thinking till now that using is also same as friend; put it anywhere irrespective of specifier. –  iammilind Sep 7 '11 at 10:47
    
-1 "not inherited" is incorrect. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Sep 7 '11 at 10:49
    
@Alf: please elaborate. do you mean it's inherited but hidden by auto-generated default operator=(TestB const&)? isn't this the same? –  Andy T Sep 7 '11 at 11:07

The question's example code as I'm writing this:

class TestA
{
    public:
        const TestA &operator=(const int A){return *this;}
};

class TestB : public TestA
{
    public:
        //Inheritance?
};

Q1: "Is the assignment operator (or any other operator) inherited?"

Yes, of course. The only member functions that are not inherited in C++98, are constructors. However, the base class implementations are by default hidden by the automatically generated copy assignment operator. Example:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class TestA
{
    public:
        TestA const& operator=( int const )
        {
            cout << "TestA = int" << endl;
            return *this;
        }
};

class TestB : public TestA
{
    public:
        // Automatically generated copy assignment operator.
};

int main()
{
    TestB   o;

    cout << "Calling automatically generated copy assignment:" << endl;
    cout << "(should be nothing here ->) ";  o = TestB();
    cout << endl;
    cout << endl;

    cout << "Calling base class assignment operator:" << endl;
    // o = 42;     // won't compile, because it's hidden.
    cout << "(should be output here ->) ";  o.TestA::operator=( 42 );   // OK.
    cout << endl;
}

Considering all the answers so far that have confused hiding and inheritance, and just to clear up the terminology here, N3290 (which is identical to C++11 standard), says this:

N3290 §10/2:
"Inherited members can be referred to in expressions in the same manner as other members of the derived class, unless their names are hidden or ambiguous"

In the example code above TestA::operator= is hidden, but see the answer to Q3.

Q2: Is the following valid?

This question refers to use of using in the derived class, like

class TestB : public TestA
{
    public:
        using TestA::operator=;
        //Inheritance?
};

Yes, that is valid.

It would not be valid in C++98 for a constructor, because constructors are not inherited.

Q3: If it is valid, would it make a difference?

Yes, it makes the base class assignment operator(s) directly accessible in the derived class.

For example, you can then remove the out-commenting in the example above,

// o = 42;     // won't compile, because it's hidden.

and it will still compile,

o = 42;        // compiles fine with "using".

Cheers & hth.,

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Alf got the right answer now but I am still a bit confused by last sentence from standard I was quating: "the operator introduced by the using-declaration is hidden by the implicitly-declared operator in the derived class." see my answer above for more detail. –  Gob00st Sep 7 '11 at 11:14
    
Thank you for the more in-depth answer. All the information is appreciated. –  SSight3 Sep 7 '11 at 11:51
    
@Alf: Q2, agreed, but I would recommend to avoid it as much as possible because a) for slicing, even if ATM nothing is sliced; b) it cannot be used in sequence, e.g. TestB t1, t2; t1 = t2 = 0; –  Andy T Sep 7 '11 at 12:25

I have found some related answer from C++ 11 standard :

12.8 Copying and moving class objects

Because a copy/move assignment operator is implicitly declared for a class if not declared by the user, a base class copy/move assignment operator is always hidden by the corresponding assignment operator of a derived class (13.5.3). A using-declaration (7.3.3) that brings in from a base class an assignment operator with a parameter type that could be that of a copy/move assignment operator for the derived class is not considered an explicit declaration of such an operator and does not suppress the implicit declaration of the derived class operator; the operator introduced by the using-declaration is hidden by the implicitly-declared operator in the derived class.

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Thank you. I usually like to hear views on stack overflow as they offer insights and considerations I don't normally think of. –  SSight3 Sep 7 '11 at 10:35
1  
The assignment operator is just a (special) member function, and is inherited. It is however, by default, hidden by an automatically generated one. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Sep 7 '11 at 10:51
    
However , I am a bit confused by last sentence from standard: the operator introduced by the using-declaration is hidden by the implicitly-declared operator in the derived class. –  Gob00st Sep 7 '11 at 11:12

Assignment operator isn't inherited by derived. If you use your overloaded assignment operator in your derived, from your base, you might encounter slicing: sizeof(base) != sizeof(derived)

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1  
I believe it would be still called "slicing" even if sizeof(base) != sizeof(derived) –  Alexander Poluektov Sep 7 '11 at 10:32
    
Thank you for your response. So if the classes have the same variables, would slicing occur? –  SSight3 Sep 7 '11 at 10:34
1  
@SSight: you will encounter slicing anytime the type of the object passed in is of a type derived from base that has its own data members. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 7 '11 at 10:36
1  
Even if there is no new data members in derived class, it is still slicing: the object of derived class is "sliced" and subobject of base class is returned. Would be disastrous if i.e. base has virtual functions which derived overrides. –  Alexander Poluektov Sep 7 '11 at 10:41
    
@Fernanades: Thank you. –  SSight3 Sep 7 '11 at 10:41

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