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I have programmed a method in the following way:

if (something) {
   return 1;
}
the rest of the code

It seems to me that the method returns 1 and then execute the rest of the code. Can it be the truth? Doesn't return stops the execution of the code. It it is not, how can I force a method to stop?

ADDED

Here is the code (as requested):

    for (int i=availableTime; i>0; i=i-1) {
            final int sec = i;
            SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
                public void run() {
                    String lbl = "<html>";
                    lbl += "</html>";
                    timeLeftLabel.setText(lbl);
            }
            });
            try {Thread.sleep(1000);} catch (InterruptedException e) {}
            parameterFromClientsListener = clientsListener.getValue(userName,parameterToGet);
            if (!parameterFromClientsListener.equals("null")) {
                output = parameterFromClientsListener;
                game.log.fine(userName + " set (by button) " + parameterToGet + " to be equal to " + output + " . [IMPORTANT]");
                return output;
            }
    }

    game.log.fine("The partner selection phase is expired.");
    // This code is executed if the Submit button was not pressed and the time run out.
    if (parameterToGet.equals("partner")) {
        tellMyChoice(parameterToGet, this.partnerFromForm, "timer of" + field);
        output = this.partnerFromForm;
    }
    game.log.fine(parameterToGet + " was submitted by timer (not by OK button).");
    } else {
    output = parameterFromClientsListener;
    }
    game.log.fine(userName + " set (by timer)" + parameterToGet + " to be equal to " + output + " . [IMPORTANT]");
    return output;
}

I run this code two times. In every case I generate a log-file. In both log files I see "set (by button)" statement (which is straight before the return). But the problem is that in the second log file I do see "timer of" statement. Which should not be reached if the "set (by button)" is reached. How can it be? I need to mention that "set (by button)" and "timer of" do not occur anywhere else in my code (they occur only once).

ADDED 3

As you can see from the code I do not have the finally statement.

share|improve this question
3  
It sounds like your method isn't actually doing return 1 inside that condition, but somewhere else. Could you post the method so we can all see it? –  AndyBursh Sep 7 '11 at 10:35
5  
Is there a finally block in the rest of the code? Otherwise it should just return control to the caller. –  S.L. Barth Sep 7 '11 at 10:35
2  
@Roman, you have over 90 questions without an accepted answer. Perhaps you can review some of the answers you have been given to see if they can be accepted. –  Peter Lawrey Sep 7 '11 at 10:42
    
@Thilo, the rate is good for a newbie. However someone who is more experienced with this forum should be able to ask questions which are likely to have an acceptable answer, and when answers need refinement, follow them up. To get one or two questions without an answer is bad luck, but 90 questions without an acceptable answer suggests there is something you can learn from that. BTW: You can answer your own question so that when people search for the same thing they can learn from what you know. It doesn't have to be one way. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Sep 7 '11 at 10:57
    
@Roman, it looks like you are polling for some event to occur. May I suggest using the Observer pattern so that you get notified when the event occurs? It would make this method a lot simpler. –  jackrabbit Sep 7 '11 at 15:45

6 Answers 6

This is not true, the return statement will stop any following code. (With the only exception being that the return statement is in a try{} block that has a finally{} block afterwards.

    if(0==0){
       return;
    }
    System.out.println("This will not print.");
share|improve this answer
    
Actually this code will not compile in Java, so technically it will not behave the way you say. –  Mathias Schwarz Sep 7 '11 at 10:39
    
@Mathias, true. I have updated the example. –  jzd Sep 7 '11 at 10:40

return does end the execution of the method. There is one exception: the finally block. In the following case, 2 would be returned

public int foo() {
  try {
    return 1;
  } finally {
    return 2;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Don't actually do that in real life, though. Changing the return value in a finally block is bad form. –  Thilo Sep 7 '11 at 10:42
    
Yes, of course. –  jackrabbit Sep 7 '11 at 15:32

Return does indeed end the execution of a method. Check Your other assumptions. Maybe something in other parts of code isn't working as You are assuming.

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Does return stops the execution of the code

well, almost.

Once a return is encountered, the method execution is stopped, and the control is passed to the calling method, after executing any finally clauses.

int add(int a, int b)
{
   try{
      if(a == 0)
      {
         return b;
      }

      if(b == 0)
      {
         return a;
      }

      return a+b;
   }
   finally
   {
      System.out.println("Finally");
   }
}

In the above code, is the function is called as add(0, 1), "Finally" will still be printed.

How can I force a method to stop?

OR What are the other ways of exiting from a method?

Exceptions

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You write

if (!parameterFromClientsListener.equals("null")) {
    output = parameterFromClientsListener;
    game.log.fine(userName + " set (by button) " + parameterToGet + " to be equal to " + output + " . [IMPORTANT]");
    return output;
}

You are comparing the string (or whatever) with the string "null", and return if they are different. Do you really want to do this, and not parameterFromClientsListener != null?

(Though that should not be a big difference, as long as parameterFromClientsListener is neither null nor "null", and if it is null, your version would give a NullPointerException.)

Do you actually get the entry in your log file? If so, you should also get the return.

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I wanted to understand how the observed behavior can be possible. In more details, I saw a "paradoxical" behavior. In my log files I saw output of the line which happens before the return as well as the output produced by the code after the return. So, I assumed that the return does not stop the execution of the program. As it has been correctly mentioned here by other "answerers" this assumption is wrong. The explanation of the behavior is trivial. My program run the shown code several times. The first time it reaches the return statement, the second time it passes it (because the return is in the if statement). So, it is why IO have the both statements in the log file.

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