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I'm building a web-app with PHP on an Apache server.

The app contains a lot of optional data about persons. Depending on the category of the person (one person can be in may categories), they can choose to specify data or not: home-address (== 5 fields for street, city, country, ...), work-address (again 5 fields), age, telephone number, .... The app stores some additional data too, of course (created, last updated, username, password, userlevel, ...).

The current/outdated version of the app has 86 fields in the "users" table, and is (depending on the category of the person), extended with an additonal table with another 23 fields (1-1 relationship).

All this is stored in a Postgresql database.

I'm wondering if this is the best way to handle this type of data. Most records have (a lot of) empty fields, making the db larger and the queries slower. Is it worth looking into an other solution like a Triple Store, or am I worrying too much about it and should I just keep the current setup? It seems odd and feels awkward to just add fields to a table for every new purpose of the site. On the other hand, I have the impression that triple stores are not that common yet. Any pointers, or suggestions how to approach this?

I've read "Programming the semantic web" by Toby Segaran and others, but from that book I get the impression that the main advantage of triple stores and RDF is the exchange of information over the web (which is not the goal of my app)

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1 Answer 1

Most records have (a lot of) empty fields

This implies that your data is far from normalized.

The current/outdated version of the app has 86 fields in the "users" table, and is (depending on the category of the person), extended with an additonal table with another 23 fields (1-1 relationship).

Indeed, yes, it's a very long way from being normalized.

If you've got a good reason to move away from where you are just now, then the firs step would be to structure your data much better. Even if you choose to move to a different type of DBMS e.g. noSQL or object db.

This does not just save space in your DBMS, it makes retrieving the data faster and reduces the amount of code you need to write (e.g. you can re-use the same code for maintaining a home address as maintaining a work address if you have a single table for 'address' with a field flagging the type of address).

There are lots of resources on the web (in addition to the wikipedia link above) describing how to apply the rules of normalization (it starts getting a little involved after 1,2 and 3 - but if you can master these then you're well equipped to take on most tasks).

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wondering if you are that right that it's not normalized. I'm storing all kinds of data about a person (eyecolor, haircolor, salary, level in the organisation, has_badge, has_companycar, has_..., etc). yes, you could put all the items that one can "have" in a table, and put an intermediate table in between linking the user and the "attributes", but i'm not sure that speeds up the queries (on the contrary). –  user410932 Sep 9 '11 at 14:28
    
and although I'd agree that having a table "attributes" to store the optional data, it seems to be moving into the direction of a triple-store... (where all fields are stored as "attributes" or "objetcts" as they'd call it) –  user410932 Sep 9 '11 at 14:46

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