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Why does C++ not have a virtual constructor?

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7  
Why didn't you select an answer as the correct one? Both "top" answers are correct. –  Trevor Jan 15 '14 at 20:46

16 Answers 16

Hear it from the horse's mouth:).

From Bjarne Stroustrup's C++ Style and Technique FAQ Why don't we have virtual constructors?

A virtual call is a mechanism to get work done given partial information. In particular, "virtual" allows us to call a function knowing only any interfaces and not the exact type of the object. To create an object you need complete information. In particular, you need to know the exact type of what you want to create. Consequently, a "call to a constructor" cannot be virtual.

The FAQ entry goes on to give the code for a way to achieve this end without a virtual constructor.

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Virtual functions basically provide polymorphic behavior. That is, when you work with an object whose dynamic type is different than the static (compile time) type with which it is referred to, it provides behavior that is appropriate for the actual type of object instead of the static type of the object.

Now try to apply that sort of behavior to a constructor. When you construct an object the static type is always the same as the actual object type since:

To construct an object, a constructor needs the exact type of the object it is to create [...] Furthermore [...]you cannot have a pointer to a constructor

(Bjarne Stroustup (P424 The C++ Programming Language SE))

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"you cannot have a pointer to a constructor" A "pointer to a constructor" has as much runtime information as an empty struct, because constructors do not have names. –  curiousguy Aug 1 at 6:01

Unlike object oriented languages such as Smalltalk or Python, where the constructor is a virtual method of the object representing the class (which means you don't need the GoF abstract factory pattern, as you can pass the object representing the class around instead of making your own), C++ is a class based language, and does not have objects representing any of the language's constructs. The class does not exist as an object at runtime, so you can't call a virtual method on it.

This fits with the 'you don't pay for what you don't use' philosophy, though every large C++ project I've seen has ended up implementing some form of abstract factory or reflection.

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1  
This is exactly the difference between construction in C++ and in a language such as Delphi, where you do have virtual constructors. Well put. –  Frederik Slijkerman Apr 9 '09 at 9:10
    
+1 - Well written as usual, Pete. –  duffymo Apr 9 '09 at 9:53
    
I was wondering how the question even made sense until I read this explanation of how object creation works in other languages. +1. –  j_random_hacker Apr 9 '09 at 10:39
3  
"Advanced C++" by James Coplien talks about how to implement virtual constructors in C++ (e.g., new animal("dog")). See users.rcn.com/jcoplien/Patterns/C++Idioms/… for some more information on how it's implemented –  Tony Lee Sep 18 '09 at 18:16

two reasons I can think of:

Technical reason

The object exists only after the constructor ends.In order for the constructor to be dispatched using the virtual table , there has to be an existing object with a pointer to the virtual table , but how can a pointer to the virtual table exist if the object still doesn't exist? :)

Logic reason

You use the virtual keyword when you want to declare a somewhat polymorphic behaviour. But there is nothing polymorphic with constructors , constructors job in C++ is to simply put an object data on the memory . Since virtual tables (and polymorphism in general) are all about polymorphic behaviour rather on polymorphic data , There is no sense with declaring a virtual constructor.

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Semantic reasons aside, there is no vtable until after the object is constructed, thus making a virtual designation useless.

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Wrong. vtables are static and constant. They exist since the loading of the code and static data of the executable. –  curiousguy Aug 1 at 5:53

We do, it's just not a constructor :-)

struct A {
  virtual ~A() {}
  virtual A * Clone() { return new A; }
};

struct B : public A {
  virtual A * Clone() { return new B; }
};

int main() {

   A * a1 = new B;
   A * a2 = a1->Clone();    // virtual construction
   delete a2;
   delete a1;
}
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1  
From this link: docwiki.embarcadero.com/RADStudio/XE4/en/… A use case, see: virtual __fastcall TYesNoDialog(TComponent *Owner); –  Eric Aug 9 '13 at 20:36

Virtual functions are used in order to invoke functions based on the type of object pointed to by the pointer, and not the type of pointer itself. But a constructor is not "invoked". It is called only once when an object is declared. So, a constructor cannot be made virtual in C++.

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so, why destructor can have virtual? –  Bình Nguyên Aug 17 '14 at 3:25

When people ask a question like this, I like to think to myself "what would happen if this were actually possible?" I don't really know what this would mean, but I guess it would have something to do with being able to override the constructor implementation based on the dynamic type of the object being created.

I see a number of potential problems with this. For one thing, the derived class will not be fully constructed at the time the virtual constructor is called, so there are potential issues with the implementation.

Secondly, what would happen in the case of multiple inheritance? Your virtual constructor would be called multiple times presumably, you would then need to have some way of know which one was being called.

Thirdly, generally speaking at the time of construction, the object does not have the virtual table fully constructed, this means it would require a large change to the language specification to allow for the fact that the dynamic type of the object would be known at construction time. This would then allow the base class constructor to maybe call other virtual functions at construction time, with a not fully constructed dynamic class type.

Finally, as someone else has pointed out you can implement a kind of virtual constructor using static "create" or "init" type functions that basically do the same thing as a virtual constructor would do.

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Although the concept of virtual constructors does not fit in well since object type is pre-requisite for object creation, its not completly over-ruled.

GOF's 'factory method' design pattern makes use of the 'concept' of virtual constructor, which is handly in certain design situations.

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The virtual mechanism only works when you have a based class pointer to a derived class object. Construction has it's own rules for the calling of base class constructors, basically base class to derived. How could a virtual constructor be useful or called? I don't know what other languages do, but I can't see how a virtual constructor could be useful or even implemented. Construction needs to have taken place for the virtual mechanism to make any sense and construction also needs to have taken place for the vtable structures to have been created which provides the mechanics of the polymorphic behaviour.

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Cant we simply say it like.. We cannot inherit constructors. So there is no point declaring them virtual because the virtual provides polymorphism .

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You shouldn't call virtual function within your constructor either. See : http://www.artima.com/cppsource/nevercall.html

In addition I'm not sure that you really need a virtual constructor. You can achieve polymorphic construction without it: you can write a function that will construct your object according to the needed parameters.

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Only way it makes sense to me is if it is a pure virtual constructor - as in saying there is nothing to do here on say a class used as an interface. The thing is, you don't have to worry about it, the compiler will work that out.

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C++ virtual constructor is not possible.For example you can not mark a constructor as virtual.Try this code

#include<iostream.h>
using namespace std;
class aClass
{
    public:
        virtual aClass()
        {   
        }  
};
int main()
{
    aClass a; 
}

It causes an error.This code is trying to declare a constructor as virtual. Now let us try to understand why we use virtual keyword. Virtual keyword is used to provide run time polymorphism. For example try this code.

#include<iostream.h>
using namespace std;
class aClass
{
    public:
        aClass()
        {
            cout<<"aClass contructor\n";
        }
        ~aClass()
        {
            cout<<"aClass destructor\n";
        }

};
class anotherClass:public aClass
{

    public:
        anotherClass()
        {
            cout<<"anotherClass Constructor\n";
        }
        ~anotherClass()
        {
            cout<<"anotherClass destructor\n";
        }

};
int main()
{
    aClass* a;
    a=new anotherClass;
    delete a;   
    getchar(); 
}

In main a=new anotherClass; allocates a memory for anotherClass in a pointer a declared as type of aClass.This causes both the constructor (In aClass and anotherClass) to call automatically.So we do not need to mark constructor as virtual.Because when an object is created it must follow the chain of creation (i.e first the base and then the derived classes). But when we try to delete a delete a; it causes to call only the base destructor.So we have to handle the destructor using virtual keyword. So virtual constructor is not possible but virtual destructor is.Thanks

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For virtual destructor try this link.stackoverflow.com/questions/461203/… might help –  Tunvir Rahman Tusher Jun 23 '13 at 11:49

Virtual functions in C++ are an implementation of run-time polymorphism, and they will do function overriding. Generally the virtual keyword is used in C++ when you need dynamic behavior. It will work only when object exists. Whereas constructors are used to create the objects. Constructors will be called at the time of object creation.

So if you create the constructor as virtual, as per the virtual keyword definition, it should have existing object to use, but constructor is used to to create the object, so this case will never exist. So you should not use the constructor as virtual.

So, if we try to declare virtual constructor compiler throw an Error:

Constructors cannot be declared virtual

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There's a very basic reason: Constructors are effectively static functions, and in C++ no static function can be virtual.

If you have much experience with C++, you know all about the difference between static & member functions. Static functions are associated with the CLASS, not the objects (instances), so they don't see a "this" pointer. Only member functions can be virtual, because the vtable- the hidden table of function pointers that makes 'virtual' work- is really a data member of each object.

Now, what is the constructor's job? It is in the name- a "T" constructor initializes T objects as they're allocated. This automatically precludes it being a member function! An object has to EXIST before it has a "this" pointer and thus a vtable. That means that even if the language treated constructors as ordinary functions (it doesn't, for related reasons I won't get into), they'd have to be static member functions.

A great way to see this is to look at the "Factory" pattern, especially factory functions. They do what you're after, and you'll notice that if class T has a factory method, it is ALWAYS STATIC. It has to be.

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Constructors are not static, period. –  curiousguy Aug 1 at 5:48

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