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How would one implement equals in a java-class which implements an interface that extends Iterable?

The interface

public interface MyInterface extends Iterable<String> {
...
}

The concrete class

public class MyClass implements MyInterface {

  private Set<String> myStrings = new HashSet<String>();

  @Override
  public Iterator<String> iterator() {
    return myStrings.iterator();
  }

  @Override
  public boolean equals(Object otherObject) {

How should I check that both this instance and the other instances contains the same set of strings? The easy way would to only check equals against this implementation and not the interface, but that sounds like cheating.

    if (otherObject instanceof MyClass) { ... } // easy, just myStrings.equals(...)

but

    if (otherObject instanceof MyInterface) { ... } // compare two iterators?

Or am I missing something? I must implement hashCode aswell, and if two objects are equal should not their hashcodes be identical hence equals must only check against MyClass to fullfil this contract?!

  }

}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

One way would be to use Guava Iterables.elementsEqual method.

http://docs.guava-libraries.googlecode.com/git-history/release09/javadoc/com/google/common/collect/Iterables.html#elementsEqual(java.lang.Iterable, java.lang.Iterable)

/**
 * Returns true if all elements in <code>searchFor</code> exist in
 * <code>searchIn</code>, otherwise returns false.
 * 
 * @param searchIn
 *            the collection in which to search for each element in
 *            <code>searchFor</code>
 * @param searchFor
 *            the collection of element to search for
 */
public static boolean containsAll(@Nonnull Iterable<?> searchIn, @Nonnull Iterable<?> searchFor) {
    for (Object o : searchFor) {
        if (!Iterables.contains(searchIn, o)) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

/**
 * Returns true if all elements in <code>searchFor</code> exist in
 * <code>searchIn</code> and no other elements exist in
 * <code>searchIn</code>, otherwise returns false.
 * 
 * @param searchIn
 *            the collection in which to search for each element in
 *            <code>searchFor</code>
 * @param searchFor
 *            the collection of element to search for
 */
public static boolean containsAllAndOnly(@Nonnull Iterable<?> searchIn,
        @Nonnull Iterable<?> searchFor) {
    if (Iterables.size(searchIn) != Iterables.size(searchFor)) {
        return false;
    }

    return containsAll(searchIn, searchFor);
}
share|improve this answer
    
As sets are unordered, is there an unordered version of this method? –  Peter Lawrey Sep 7 '11 at 12:52
    
Not in the Guava library (that I know of). I have my own add-on to Guava that implemented containsAll that iterates over one iterable and calls Iterables.contains on the other. Using the Set mechanism you describe above would probably be more efficient. –  John B Sep 7 '11 at 12:57
    
I also created a containsAllAndOnly that calls containsAll after checking that the size of each Iterable is the same using Iterables.size. –  John B Sep 7 '11 at 13:00
    
+1 for effort. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Sep 7 '11 at 13:06

When comparing Sets, a Collection (its super-interface) will never be equals even if it contains the same objects.

If two classes are equal, they must have the same hashCode(). Its is worth noting that HashSet is not ordered and two sets with the same elements can be in different orders.

So if you have only an Iterator, you have to add all the elements to a Set, before you do the comparison in any case.

As an experiment I generated some combinations you can get with the same Set.

share|improve this answer
    
Care would have to be taken with the Set mechanism you describe in case the Iterable contains multiple instances of equal objects. A Set will collapse those into a single instance and so the multiplicity would be lost. –  John B Sep 7 '11 at 13:08
    
@John B, That is true, however comparing a Set and a List is not straight forward. (Sets can't have duplicates) which is why the JDK assumes Sets and Lists are never equal. (even empty ones) –  Peter Lawrey Sep 7 '11 at 13:36
    
So basically check that all elements from the other objects iterator exist in this set and that this set does not contains more (containsAllAndOnly method by @John). –  Axel Sep 9 '11 at 8:34

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