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I am new to C# and never tried to create a try catch block, I am getting an error where the error indicates "A key already exists" in one of the HybridDictionary, How can I put the .Adds in a Try catch block and ignore it if the key already exists:

here is the original code with the 2 HybridDictionaries:

public MWRichTextBox() : base() {

        // Initialize default text and background colors
        textColor = RtfColor.Black;
        highlightColor = RtfColor.White;

        // Initialize the dictionary mapping color codes to definitions
        rtfColor = new HybridDictionary();
        rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.Aqua, RtfColorDef.Aqua);
        rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.Black, RtfColorDef.Black);
        rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.Blue, RtfColorDef.Blue);
        rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.Fuchsia, RtfColorDef.Fuchsia);
        rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.Gray, RtfColorDef.Gray);
        rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.Green, RtfColorDef.Green);
        rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.Lime, RtfColorDef.Lime);
        rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.Maroon, RtfColorDef.Maroon);
        rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.Navy, RtfColorDef.Navy);
        rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.Olive, RtfColorDef.Olive);
        rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.Purple, RtfColorDef.Purple);
        rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.Red, RtfColorDef.Red);
        rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.Silver, RtfColorDef.Silver);
        rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.Teal, RtfColorDef.Teal);
        rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.White, RtfColorDef.White);
        rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.Yellow, RtfColorDef.Yellow);
        rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.WhiteSmoke, RtfColorDef.WhiteSmoke);

        // Initialize the dictionary mapping default Framework font families to
        // RTF font families
        rtfFontFamily = new HybridDictionary();
        rtfFontFamily.Add(FontFamily.GenericMonospace.Name, RtfFontFamilyDef.Modern);
        rtfFontFamily.Add(FontFamily.GenericSansSerif, RtfFontFamilyDef.Swiss);
        rtfFontFamily.Add(FontFamily.GenericSerif, RtfFontFamilyDef.Roman);
        rtfFontFamily.Add(FF_UNKNOWN, RtfFontFamilyDef.Unknown);

        // Get the horizontal and vertical resolutions at which the object is
        // being displayed
        using(Graphics _graphics = this.CreateGraphics()) {
            xDpi = _graphics.DpiX;
            yDpi = _graphics.DpiY;
        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
Is it essential that it goes in a try catch block? I try to avoid them wherever necessary, and here is necessary. In my opinion, it would be better to check if an entry exists in the collection before adding it. –  hdougie Sep 7 '11 at 12:56
    
Every time an exception is ignored, a kitten dies. Do not use try/catch to suppress errors. Use it to handle and report errors. –  David Sep 7 '11 at 13:00

8 Answers 8

As an alternative to a catch-all qaundary, I'd suggest checking if the item exists via key by means of the Contains method. For instance:

if (!rtfColor.Contains(RtfColor.White))
{
    rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.White, RtfColorDef.White);
}

Let's take this a little further to exemplify Jim B's suggestion (since this does introduce extra lines per add and could quickly become overwhelming), we can create a simple method to "add items safely", that is, add items to the collection only if an item doesn't already exist with a specific key (you may apply more specificity in terms of method naming and access etc, but as an example):

private void AddItemToDictionary(HybridDictionary dictionary, object key, object value)
{
    if (!dictionary.Contains(key))
    {
        dictionary.Add(key, value);
    }
}

AddItemToDictionary(rtfColor, RtfColor.Black, RtfColorDef.Black);
AddItemToDictionary(rtfColor, RtfColor.White, RtfColorDef.White);
AddItemToDictionary(rtfColor, RtfColor.Red, RtfColorDef.Red);

This could be extended rather simply to do the updating, if necessary.

When to use try/catch is kind of another story, when to use try/catch to ignore errors is another lifetime.

share|improve this answer
6  
Definitely prefer this way of doing it. Create a method called AddToDictionary(), which checks to see if the key exists. If it doesn't; add it in. If it does; either skip or update. –  Jim B Sep 7 '11 at 12:58
    
Thank you for your help @Mr. Disappointment, where should I create this method right after creating the HybridDictionary? –  user932742 Sep 7 '11 at 13:50
    
@user932742 You can place the method within the class of the control itself - you don't define it within the method body using HybridDictionary, but outside of it, and reuse the code by calling it by name (and supplying the arguments for parameters) when necessary. –  Grant Thomas Sep 7 '11 at 17:01

even if you wrap your code into a try catch block the code after the line that throws the exception won't be execute but only the code within the catch/finally block will be executed so you should wrap all the .Add statement (which would be really really bad) You should always prevent your code from throwing exception and when is possible you should avoid it. What about creating a method (or an extension method) that check if the item already exist into the array and if it is not the item will be added? have a look at the below dictionary extension method it will work for any dictionary

 public static class DictionaryExtension
    {
        public static void AddItemIfNotExist<TKey,TValue>(this Dictionary<TKey,TValue> dictionary, TKey key,TValue item)
        {
            if (!dictionary.ContainsKey(key))
            {
                dictionary.Add(key, item);
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Do i need to this each and every (key, item) or can I use it for all at once? –  user932742 Sep 7 '11 at 13:30
    
you need to use if every time(basically it replace the normal .Add()) –  Massimiliano Peluso Sep 7 '11 at 13:31
    
I am really sorry that you are dealing with a beginner beginner level, where do I create this class? before the public MWRichTextBox() : base() class? –  user932742 Sep 7 '11 at 13:40
    
wherever you want in your project. if you use namespace remember to include it. just to test it you can copy and paste it just above your public MWRichTextBox() : base() { ..... –  Massimiliano Peluso Sep 7 '11 at 13:51

You could just add a try-catch block around the whole thing like so:

   try
    {
        // Your code inside here
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
        // do nothing and be silent
    }

But I must say that I do not recommend this approach. Look through your code and look for a better more stable approach than just silently swallowing an error.

share|improve this answer

You'd have to surround each add like this:

try 
{
    rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.Aqua, RtfColorDef.Aqua);
}
catch (Exception e)  // use right type of exception here
{
    // log exception
}

But it would be better to use Mr Disappointment's answer.

share|improve this answer

To ignore all exceptions:

try {
    // Your code.
}
catch {
}

To ignore just an exception of particular type:

try {
    // Your code.
}
catch (SpecificException) {
}
share|improve this answer
    
You should ever just catch all exceptions. Only catch the ones you know may be raised and you can deal with in this code. Let the rest bubble up. –  ChrisF Sep 7 '11 at 13:00
public MWRichTextBox() : base() { 

        // Initialize default text and background colors 
        textColor = RtfColor.Black; 
        highlightColor = RtfColor.White; 
        try
        {
        // Initialize the dictionary mapping color codes to definitions 
        rtfColor = new HybridDictionary(); 
        rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.Aqua, RtfColorDef.Aqua); 
        rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.Black, RtfColorDef.Black); 
        rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.Blue, RtfColorDef.Blue); 
        rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.Fuchsia, RtfColorDef.Fuchsia); 
        rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.Gray, RtfColorDef.Gray); 
        rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.Green, RtfColorDef.Green); 
        rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.Lime, RtfColorDef.Lime); 
        rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.Maroon, RtfColorDef.Maroon); 
        rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.Navy, RtfColorDef.Navy); 
        rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.Olive, RtfColorDef.Olive); 
        rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.Purple, RtfColorDef.Purple); 
        rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.Red, RtfColorDef.Red); 
        rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.Silver, RtfColorDef.Silver); 
        rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.Teal, RtfColorDef.Teal); 
        rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.White, RtfColorDef.White); 
        rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.Yellow, RtfColorDef.Yellow); 
        rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.WhiteSmoke, RtfColorDef.WhiteSmoke); 

        // Initialize the dictionary mapping default Framework font families to 
        // RTF font families 
        rtfFontFamily = new HybridDictionary(); 
        rtfFontFamily.Add(FontFamily.GenericMonospace.Name, RtfFontFamilyDef.Modern); 
        rtfFontFamily.Add(FontFamily.GenericSansSerif, RtfFontFamilyDef.Swiss); 
        rtfFontFamily.Add(FontFamily.GenericSerif, RtfFontFamilyDef.Roman); 
        rtfFontFamily.Add(FF_UNKNOWN, RtfFontFamilyDef.Unknown); 
        }
        catch
        {
        }
        // Get the horizontal and vertical resolutions at which the object is 
        // being displayed 
        using(Graphics _graphics = this.CreateGraphics()) { 
            xDpi = _graphics.DpiX; 
            yDpi = _graphics.DpiY; 
        } 
    } 
share|improve this answer

Instead of try/catch, just check if the dictionary contains the key already:

if(!rtfColor.ContainsKey(RtfColor.Aqua))
{
   rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.Aqua, RtfColorDef.Aqua);
}

The problem with wrapping the whole thing in a try/catch is that you will miss any values you attempted to add after the one throwing the exception.

share|improve this answer
    
Can I do that for all at once like <code> if(!rtfColor.ContainsKey(RtfColor.Aqua,RtfColor.Blue,....)) { rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.Aqua, RtfColorDef.Aqua); } </code> –  user932742 Sep 7 '11 at 13:21
    
nope, unless you can somehow loop through the values. –  Erix Sep 7 '11 at 13:22

You can't. The problem is that if you get an exception, you will get thrown out of the try sequence. You either will have to put try/catch in front of all the calls to an .Add method, or try to do it in a more elgant way, which is:

  1. Form a dictionary of all your RtfColor/RtfColorDef pairs.
  2. Iterate through it with a foreach loop. In the body of foreach, check if the pair you are checking is already in the rtfColor. Only one try/catch will be required in that case. Make sure you put catch { continue; }.
share|improve this answer
    
This not my code our programmer moved to a different company and I am just a newbie, I don't know if forming a new dictionary will screw up anything or not, if I put try/catch in front of all the calls how is that going to work? try { rtfColor.Add(RtfColor.Aqua, RtfColorDef.Aqua); } catch (Exception) { throw; } What would be the exception here? –  user932742 Sep 7 '11 at 13:16
    
It will be ok. Go ahead. –  Maxim V. Pavlov Sep 7 '11 at 13:58

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