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I appear to have found a flaw with CSS3 transitions. Hopefully not though. Here is the dilemma.

.element a span {
   display:none;
   opacity:0;
   position:absolute;
   top:-10px;
   -webkit-transition-property:top, opacity;
   -webkit-transition-duration:500ms;

}
.element a:hover span {
   display:inline;
   opacity:0.8;
   position:absolute;
   top:10px;
}

The transition does not work like this at all. If one removes the display:none attribute then it does work, however we need in this case the display:none attribute on our link so that it cannot be interfaced with before hover.

Any ideas?

Marvellous

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

you could try put overflow: hidden on the a, that way the span should appear invisible, without the need to use display: none; as you have moved it 10px up.

or instead of display:none; try use visibility:hidden;

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Hi! Nice article about this: CSS3 transitions using visibility and delay –  Ömür Yanıkoğlu Feb 12 at 9:55

Changing display:none to display:inline makes the other properties moot as far as transitions are concerned. So separate the display:none/display:block change from the class change, using setTimeout. The browser needs to see them as separate changes in order to apply your transition. Sadly I think this means you can't just use :hover but will need a JS event handler on hover.

Specifically, I would use an inline style attribute of style="display:none" that you add or remove with JS, and take display:none out of the stylesheet.

Then, in JS, after removing display:none (explicitly or via the :hover pseudoclass's style rule), use a setTimeout function that explicitly adds/removes the class. That way the "this is display:inline" change is a discrete, earlier paint-able action from the other style property changes that you want the transition rules applied to.

In the opposite direction, change the class back in an event handler, and use a setTimeout function to set display:none as an inline style. The timeout will need to match the transition duration of course (so that display:none happens after the transition is complete).

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I've used this technique. It's not as clean as using visibility/opacity but can make life easier for the browser when there are a lot of hidden elements. –  Felix Jan 20 at 11:25

or you can try using width or height 0 combined with overflow hidden on the invisible element so it doesn't disturb any of the other elements whilst preserving the transitions.

ie.

.element a span {
   overflow: hidden;
   height: 0;
   width: 0;
   opacity:0;
   position:absolute;
   top:-10px;
   -webkit-transition-property:top, opacity;
   -webkit-transition-duration:500ms;

}
.element a:hover span {
   overflow: visible;
   height: ???px;
   width: ???px;
   opacity:0.8;
   position:absolute;
   top:10px;
}
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I would go with JS. CSS transitions suck with heights. Here is what I used to make a click expand function, you could change a few things and do the same on a hover

// Dropdown

$(function(){

    // Target the ul sibling to keep it generic
    var selector = $('.dropdown article > ul').siblings().addClass('selector');

    selector.click(function(){
                var targetUl = $(this).siblings('ul');

                if (targetUl.hasClass('open')) {
                            targetUl.removeClass('open').slideUp();
                } else {
                            targetUl.slideDown().addClass('open');
                }
    });

});

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