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How can I check whether Java is available (in the PATH or via JAVA_HOME) from a bash script and make sure the version is at least 1.5?

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Java 5 has been end-of-life for quite a long time. Java 6 will be end-of-life very soon. You should be moving to Java 6 as a priority, and to 7 as soon as you can. –  kittylyst Sep 7 '11 at 13:38
1  
What have you tried? –  Brian Roach Sep 7 '11 at 13:38
    
@Brian: Nothing; My hope is that someone has a "bash search path function" handy. –  Aaron Digulla Sep 7 '11 at 14:16
    
@kittylyst: This is a minimal requirement. My software doesn't need Java 6 features, so there is no point forcing users for something better. But thanks for pointing it out anyway. –  Aaron Digulla Sep 7 '11 at 14:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Perhaps something like:

if type -p java; then
    echo found java executable in PATH
    _java=java
elif [[ -n "$JAVA_HOME" ]] && [[ -x "$JAVA_HOME/bin/java" ]];  then
    echo found java executable in JAVA_HOME     
    _java="$JAVA_HOME/bin/java"
else
    echo "no java"
fi

if [[ "$_java" ]]; then
    version=$("$_java" -version 2>&1 | awk -F '"' '/version/ {print $2}')
    echo version "$version"
    if [[ "$version" > "1.5" ]]; then
        echo version is more than 1.5
    else         
        echo version is less than 1.5
    fi
fi
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Excellent. I was missing the type builtin. –  Aaron Digulla Sep 7 '11 at 14:31
    
Ug sorry cant get comments to format. This fails when Java version is 1.10. This is because string comapre is not a number compare. Also the answer is wrong when version is "1.5" Though I guess that would be "1.5.0" so I guess its okay. –  Andrew Jan 23 at 20:53
    
good point. you could do something like: IFS=. read major minor extra <<<"$version"; if (( major == 1 && minor > 5 )); ... -- would have to check for invalid octal numbers like "08". –  glenn jackman Jan 23 at 21:42
    
the "type -p java" won't work in "sh"; so, for portability, use #!/bin/bash in the script, rather than #!/bin/sh (though, it's possible that /bin/sh isn't actually bourne shell, but rather a backward compatible variant) –  michael_n Sep 12 at 5:45

You can obtain java version via:

JAVA_VER=$(java -version 2>&1 | sed 's/java version "\(.*\)\.\(.*\)\..*"/\1\2/; 1q')

it will give you 16 for java like 1.6.0_13 and 15 for version like 1.5.0_17.

So you can easily compare it in shell:

[ "$JAVA_VER" -ge 15 ] && echo "ok, java is 1.5 or newer" || echo "it's too old..."
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The result of 'java -version' with OpenJDK 8 is slightly different, "java" is replaced by "openjdk" in the output. This expression works with both cases: sed 's/.*version "\(.*\)\.\(.*\)\..*"/\1\2/; 1q' –  Emmanuel Bourg Aug 8 at 22:30

You can issue java -version and read & parse the output, this & this entries can help you a quick

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This is very close to what I want. Do you know of a version which also searches $PATH before it calls locate (which isn't always available)? –  Aaron Digulla Sep 7 '11 at 14:18

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