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Is it true that goto jumps across bits of code without calling destructors and things?

e.g.

void f() {
   int x = 0;
   goto lol;
}

int main() {
   f();
lol:
   return 0;
}

Won't x be leaked?

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9  
What does "Won't x be leaked" mean? The type of x is a built-in data type. Why don't you choose a better example? –  Nawaz Sep 7 '11 at 14:05
1  
@Nawaz: The example is perfect the way it is. Almost every time I talk to somebody about goto, they think that even automatic storage duration variables are somehow "leaked". That you and I know otherwise is completely besides the point. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 7 '11 at 14:05
17  
@Tomalak: I have to agree with @Nawaz: if you are going to write a FAQ question at all, you should make it a good question, and this one isn't (regardless of the 13 upvotes). For starters, you should have used a type that can actually leak something (as std::string, or std::vector<int>), and then you should use a construct that will at the very least compile. It is interesting to point out the scope of the goto, but this is mixing two different questions: Is that goto allowed? Can a goto that jumps across a scope boundary cause a resource leak? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 7 '11 at 14:12
1  
@David: I agree that this question makes a lot more sense when the variable has a non-trivial destructor... and I looked in Tomalak's answer and did find such an example. Furthermore, while an int cannot leak, it can be leaked. For example: void f(void) { new int(5); } leaks an int. –  Ben Voigt Sep 7 '11 at 14:42
5  
@Tomalak: To be precise, the code represents your interpretation of a belief from a real programmer. Read the original question again, in no place in that question there is any mention of goto jumping to a different function, nor there is any mention of the types being trivially destructible, as a matter of fact, my interpretation of the original question is that he is managing resources with some local RAII object and is afraid that the managed resource will leak. Then again, this is up to interpretation, and my interpretation is that I don't find this to be a good question. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 7 '11 at 14:42
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1 Answer 1

up vote 129 down vote accepted

Warning: This answer pertains to C++ only; the rules are quite different in C.


Won't x be leaked?

No, absolutely not.

It is a myth that goto is some low-level construct that allows you to override C++'s built-in scoping mechanisms. (If anything, it's longjmp that may be prone to this.)

Consider the following mechanics that prevent you from doing "bad things" with labels (which includes case labels).


1. Label scope

You can't jump across functions:

void f() {
   int x = 0;
   goto lol;
}

int main() {
   f();
lol:
   return 0;
}

// error: label 'lol' used but not defined

[n3290: 6.1/1]: [..] The scope of a label is the function in which it appears. [..]


2. Object initialisation

You can't jump across object initialisation:

int main() {
   goto lol;
   int x = 0;
lol:
   return 0;
}

// error: jump to label ‘lol’
// error:   from here
// error:   crosses initialization of ‘int x’

If you jump back across object initialisation, then the object's previous "instance" is destroyed:

struct T {
   T() { cout << "*T"; }
  ~T() { cout << "~T"; }
};

int main() {
   int x = 0;

  lol:
   T t;
   if (x++ < 5)
     goto lol;
}

// Output: *T~T*T~T*T~T*T~T*T~T*T~T

[n3290: 6.6/2]: [..] Transfer out of a loop, out of a block, or back past an initialized variable with automatic storage duration involves the destruction of objects with automatic storage duration that are in scope at the point transferred from but not at the point transferred to. [..]

You can't jump into the scope of an object, even if it's not explicitly initialised:

int main() {
   goto lol;
   {
      std::string x;
lol:
      x = "";
   }
}

// error: jump to label ‘lol’
// error:   from here
// error:   crosses initialization of ‘std::string x’

... except for certain kinds of object, which the language can handle regardless because they do not require "complex" construction:

int main() {
   goto lol;
   {
      int x;
lol:
      x = 0;
   }
}

// OK

[n3290: 6.7/3]: It is possible to transfer into a block, but not in a way that bypasses declarations with initialization. A program that jumps from a point where a variable with automatic storage duration is not in scope to a point where it is in scope is ill-formed unless the variable has scalar type, class type with a trivial default constructor and a trivial destructor, a cv-qualified version of one of these types, or an array of one of the preceding types and is declared without an initializer. [..]


3. Jumping abides by scope of other objects

Likewise, objects with automatic storage duration are not "leaked" when you goto out of their scope:

struct T {
   T() { cout << "*T"; }
  ~T() { cout << "~T"; }
};

int main() {
   {
      T t;
      goto lol;
   }

lol:
   return 0;
}

// *T~T

[n3290: 6.6/2]: On exit from a scope (however accomplished), objects with automatic storage duration (3.7.3) that have been constructed in that scope are destroyed in the reverse order of their construction. [..]


Conclusion

The above mechanisms ensure that goto doesn't let you break the language.

Of course, this doesn't automatically mean that you "should" use goto for any given problem, but it does mean that it is not nearly as "evil" as the common myth leads people to believe.

share|improve this answer
9  
Great coverage of a common misconception. +1 and FAQ tag added. –  Ben Voigt Sep 7 '11 at 13:50
5  
You might note that C doesn't prevent all of these dangerous things from happening. –  Daniel Sep 7 '11 at 14:04
6  
@Daniel: The question and answer are very specifically about C++, but fair point. Maybe we can have another FAQ dispelling the myth that C and C++ are the same ;) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 7 '11 at 14:06
3  
@Tomalak: I don't think we're disagreeing here. Many of the answers given on SO are explicitly documented somewhere. I was just making the point that it might be tempting for a C programmer to see this answer and assume that if it works in C++, it should work similarly in C. –  Daniel Sep 7 '11 at 14:18
5  
Wow, I had just assumed C++'s semantics were broken for goto, but they're surprisingly sane! Great answer. –  Joseph Garvin Jan 13 '12 at 14:10
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