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I am reading file contents in perl by following code

my @files = glob("$PATH/*");
foreach my $file (@files){
    open(MYFILE,"<$file");
    my @fileContent = <MYFILE>;
    close(MYFILE);
}

Now, I want to prepend auto-incrementing number to each line. Something like --

fileContent[0] = 1: This
fileContent[1] = 2: is
fileContent[2] = 3: a
fileContent[3] = 4: text
fileContent[4] = 5: file.

Does someone know an efficient way to do it?

Thanks!

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5 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

How about a one-liner?

perl -wne 'print "$.: $_"; close ARGV if eof;' path/*

Or inside a script, with an array:

use strict;
use warnings;
use autodie;

while (<tmp/data*>) {
    open my $fh, '<', $_;
    my @fileContent;
    push @fileContent, "$.: $_" while <$fh>;
}

Documentation on $. here.

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2  
You could also use sprintf if you need to format the number (e.g., to a certain width), and I'd recommend checking out perlvar for further information on $.. –  Jon Purdy Sep 7 '11 at 16:19
    
Thanks for the answer! The script one suits me the best! :) –  Rahil Parikh Sep 8 '11 at 19:02
    
@Rah You are most welcome. –  TLP Sep 8 '11 at 19:21
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Try this for your assignment line:

my $i;
my @fileContent = map{++$i.":  $_"} (<MYFILE>)
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This may be a bit slow on large files, but can easily be transformed into a for loop to overcome that problem. –  Chris Lutz Sep 7 '11 at 15:43
    
Hey! Looks nice but how large file you are talking about? –  Rahil Parikh Sep 7 '11 at 15:57
    
Large in computer terms. Large as in, takes a long time to load all from disk or can't be read into memory. –  Robert P Sep 7 '11 at 16:27
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Efficient? I don't know that there is really an inefficient way to do it (unless you make it inefficient on purpose).

for my $lineNumber (1..@fileContent) {
    substr( $fileContent[$lineNumber-1], 0, 0, "$lineNumber: " );
}
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Thanks for the suggestion but I thought looping would be inefficient way to do it as it am doing this for multiple files and each file has hundreds/thousands of lines. –  Rahil Parikh Sep 7 '11 at 16:00
2  
A for loop is probably the fastest way of doing this. And, it's pretty fast too. Doing hundreds of files and each has hundreds or thousands of lines won't take more than a minute. You can use the Perl map function. It's shorter because it takes one line of code, It's cooler too because when we use it, the girls swooning "Oh, he's so hot! He knows how to use the Perl "map" command. However, the map is probably slower in executing than a for loop. –  David W. Sep 7 '11 at 16:16
2  
@David All the cool girls do say that. It is known. However, while might be preferable where memory usage is concerned. –  TLP Sep 7 '11 at 16:23
1  
@TLP: You're correct about the while command taking less memory. –  David W. Sep 7 '11 at 16:29
1  
the overhead of reading the file is going to make any other time efficiency insignificant. if you are talking about memory efficiency, from your original example I assumed you needed the whole file loaded in memory. If not, that's a much bigger opportunity for efficiency than how you add the line number –  ysth Sep 7 '11 at 17:48
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Here is your code, edited to use lexical variables, 3 arg open, and a map statement to add the line numbers.

my @files = glob("$PATH/*");
foreach my $file (@files){
    open my $fh,'<', $file or die $!;
    my $i = 1;
    my @fileContent = map {$i++.": $_"} <$fh>;

    # do something with @fileContent
}

Here is an example that is a bit more perlish (using more of the automatic features):

for (<$PATH/*>) {
    local @ARGV = $_;
    my $i = 1;
    my @lines = map {$i++.": $_"} <>;

    # do something with @lines
}

And here is an example that makes use of $. (the input line number) and a while loop to read the file line by line.

for (<$PATH/*>) {
    local (@ARGV, $_) = $_;
    my @lines;
    push @lines, "$.: $_" while <>;

    # do something with @lines
}
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I did a quick test and the numbers reset at least with perl 5.12 –  Eric Strom Sep 7 '11 at 18:32
    
Nevermind, my mistake. You use a new @ARGV for each file. –  TLP Sep 7 '11 at 19:31
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Change your open to:

open MYFILE, '-|', 'grep', '-n', '', $file
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