Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i am pretty sure i saw nice thing some time ago (maybe in Enterprise library, not sure), but i just cant google it now - generic variable wrapper for making it persistent by storing it in session. Usage like this:

Persistent< string > Name {get;set;}

// reguest 1.

Name = "A"; // in fact storing to session.. maybe Name.Value = "A" is necessary, not sure if implicit cast can be done here

// reguest 2.

return Name; // returns string "A", implicit conversion

of course, I would implement it myself already before asking, but i cant think of any good (consistent and fast) way to determine session keys for variables (how to make sure, I will get the same for the Name every time, but different for Age, you know..)

Thanx, Roman

share|improve this question
    
You're just trying to make a session wrapper object, correct? –  Tejs Sep 7 '11 at 15:38

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you're going to make a custom session wrapper, I would suggest using an expression to make sure your magic strings don't get outdated.

 public int SomeProperty
 {
     get { return GetValueFor(x => x.SomeProperty); }
     set { SetValueFor(x => x.SomeProperty, value); }
 }

 protected T GetValueFor<T>(Expression<Func<ThisClass, T>> propertySelector)
 {
     string propertyName = // Get Value from expression.. to loo long to post here

     return (T)_session[propertyName];
 }

 protected SetValueFor<T>(Expression<Func<ThisClass, T>> propertySelector, object value)
 {
     string propertyName = // Get value from expression

     _session[propertyName] = value;
 }

This way, all your properties are just mapped on the session object in a strongly typed way, and if you ever refactor, you dont have to worry about magic strings.

share|improve this answer
1  
And don't forget to make sure that the session key includes something to disambiguate ThisClassInstance1.SomeProperty, ThatClassInstance1.SomeProperty, ThatClassInstance2.SomeProperty, ThisClassInstanceN.SomeProperty etc etc. –  LukeH Sep 7 '11 at 15:58

Something along these lines:

private int CustomerID
{
    get
    {
        if( Session["CustomerID"] != null )
            return Convert.ToInt32( Session["CustomerID"] );
        else
            return 0;
    }
    set { Session["CustomerID"] = value; }
}

EDIT:

An alternative might be something like this:

public class Persist<T>
{
    private string ObjectName;

    public Persist( string Name )
    {
        ObjectName = Name;
    }

    public T Get()
    {
        return (T)(HttpContext.Current.Session[ObjectName]); 
    }

    public void Set(T value)
    {
        HttpContext.Current.Session[ObjectName] = value;
    }
}

This is shown wrapped into a simple Singleton class.

public class SV
{
    private static readonly SV instance = new SV( );

    public Persist<DateTime> FiscalDate;
    public Persist<decimal> Revenue;

    private SV( )
    {
        FiscalDate = new Persist<DateTime>( "FiscalDate" );
        Revenue = new Persist<decimal>( "Revenue" );
    }

   public static SV Instance
   {
      get 
      {
         return instance; 
      }
   }
}

Usage is a bit wordy, unfortunately.

protected void Page_Load( object sender, EventArgs e )
{
    if( !Page.IsPostBack )
    {
        SV.Instance.Revenue.Set( 1234567890M );
        SV.Instance.FiscalDate.Set( new DateTime( 2011, 3, 15 ) );
    }
}

protected void Button1_Click( object sender, EventArgs e )
{
    DateTime when = SV.Instance.FiscalDate.Get( );
    decimal amount = SV.Instance.Revenue.Get( );
}
share|improve this answer
    
yes, of course, this is trivial solution which i want to encapsulate, because i will have many of variables with this behaviour, and I like things DRY –  rouen Sep 8 '11 at 8:02

Thanks jim31415 and I wrapper my session like followings,

internal class SessionHelper {
    private void Set<T>(string key, T value) {
        HttpContext.Current.Session[key] = value;
    }
    private T Get<T>(string key) {
        return (T)HttpContext.Current.Session[key];
    }

    public int MemberID {
        get { return Get<int>("SK_MemberID"); }
        set { Set<int>("SK_MemberID", value); }
    }
    public string MemberAccount {
        get { return Get<string>("SK_MemberAccount"); }
        set { Set<string>("SK_MemberAccount", value); }
    }
    public string MemberDisplayName {
        get { return Get<string>("SK_MemberDisplayName"); }
        set { Set<string>("SK_MemberDisplayName", value); }
    }
    public string MemberGuid {
        get { return Get<string>("SK_MemberGuid"); }
        set { Set<string>("SK_MemberGuid", value); }
    }
}

With this thread, the helper class can be declared with static keyword.

share|improve this answer

I guess one way you could do it is:

public class Persistent<T>
{
    private readonly string _sessionKey;
    private static readonly bool _valueType;

    static Persistent()
    {
        _valueType = typeof(T).IsValueType;
    }

    public Persistent(T value = default(T))
    {
        _sessionKey = Guid.NewGuid().ToString();
        SetValue(value);
    }

    private void SetValue(T value)
    {
        var item = (_valueType)
          ? new PersistentWrapper { Value = value }
          : (object)value;

        HttpContext.Current.Session[_sessionKey] = item;
    }

    private T GetValue()
    {
        object item = HttpContext.Current.Session[_sessionKey];
        if (item != null)
        {
            if (_valueType) return ((PersistentWrapper)item).Value;

            return (T)item;
        }

        return default(T);
    }

    [Serializable]
    private class PersistentWrapper
    {
        public T Value { get; set; }
    }

    public static implicit operator T(Persistent<T> value)
    {
        if (value == null) return default(T);
        return value.GetValue();
    }

    public static implicit operator Persistent<T>(T value)
    {
        return new Persistent<T>(value);
    }
}

Which could be used as:

public class Person
{
    public Persistent<string> Name { get; set; }
    public Persistent<int> Age { get; set; }
}

With usage:

var person = new Person();
person.Name = "Matt";
person.Age = 27;

Although it just feels dirty to me...

share|improve this answer
    
this solution is wrong - guid will be different each time the instance is created - for each request.. so you cant retrieve the value stored in previous request processing; –  rouen Sep 8 '11 at 7:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.