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Is it possible to delete the 'first' record from a table in SQL Server, without using any WHERE condition and without using a cursor?

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Would you like to qualify your demands? – cjk Apr 9 '09 at 10:43
    
What RDBMS are you using? – Quassnoi Apr 9 '09 at 10:43
9  
Are we seriously going to sit here and argue over how ambiguous SQL Server is? I think the terminology of the major RDBMS's has been standard for some time (SQL Server, MySQL, Postgres, Oracle, SQLite, etc.) and it's not that confusing. – TheTXI Apr 9 '09 at 12:46
5  
Don't forget FoxPro! It's a database. A very furry one. – belgariontheking Apr 9 '09 at 12:58
1  
@TheTXI No such tag was present at the time of my post, it was added lateron by someone else (have a look at the edit log). And without it I do find it ambigious and I do like annoying those people that think Microsoft is the only software developer in the world ;) – soulmerge Apr 9 '09 at 14:28
up vote 73 down vote accepted
WITH  q AS
        (
        SELECT TOP 1 *
        FROM    mytable
        /* You may want to add ORDER BY here */
        )
DELETE
FROM    q

Note that

DELETE TOP (1)
FROM   mytable

will also work, but, as stated in the documentation:

The rows referenced in the TOP expression used with INSERT, UPDATE, or DELETE are not arranged in any order.

Therefore, it's better to use WITH and an ORDER BY clause, which will let you specify more exactly which row you consider to be the first.

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1  
Note that when using WITH in expression, previous sql statement should be terminated with semi-colon (;) – Alexander Aug 27 '15 at 14:32

depends on your DBMS (people don't seem to know what that is nowadays)

-- MYSql:
DELETE FROM table LIMIT 1;
-- Postgres:
DELETE FROM table LIMIT 1;
-- MSSql:
DELETE TOP(1) FROM table;
-- Oracle:
DELETE FROM table WHERE ROWNUM = 1;
share|improve this answer
    
Oracle's one violates "without ... where" restriction (whatever is the purpose of said restriction). – Stanislav Kniazev Apr 9 '09 at 10:51

No, AFAIK, it's not possible to do it portably.

There's no defined "first" record anyway - on different SQL engines it's perfectly possible that "SELECT * FROM table" might return the results in a different order each time.

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Define "First"? If the table has a PK then it will be ordered by that, and you can delete by that:

DECLARE @TABLE TABLE
(
    ID INT IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
    Data NVARCHAR(50) NOT NULL
)

INSERT INTO @TABLE(Data)
SELECT 'Hello' UNION
SELECT 'World' 

SET ROWCOUNT 1
DELETE FROM @TABLE
SET ROWCOUNT 0

SELECT * FROM @TABLE

If the table has no PK, then ordering won't be guaranteed...

share|improve this answer
    
What if I have clustered index that is not the same as my PK? – onedaywhen Apr 9 '09 at 11:03
    
Ah of course, my bad - Then it will be by the first row in the clustered index, as that physically orders the rows, not the PK. Apologies for the confusion. – Meff Apr 9 '09 at 11:15
    
Even then, it's not guaranteed to be the "first" ordered by the clustered index. SQL Server makes no guarantees on this. – Damien_The_Unbeliever Apr 9 '09 at 12:55
    
See slide 7 on the following, for example. google.com/url?sa=U&start=3&q=http://www.microsoft.at/… – Damien_The_Unbeliever Apr 9 '09 at 13:01
    
I like that PPT, thank you very much. LOL at "NoLock is a cool hint" - I worked in a place that believed that and would not accept otherwise. I left. – Meff Apr 11 '09 at 8:48

Does this really make sense?
There is no "first" record in a relational database, you can only delete one random record.

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1  
It makes sense when you mix in "order by"; Question doesn't mention not to use "order by", just not "where" and cursors – Sung Apr 9 '09 at 12:41
    
Only if you order by a column that is unique. If it's not unique, you still don't know exactly which record you delete. – Christian Specht Apr 9 '09 at 13:54

What do you mean by «'first' record from a table» ? There's no such concept as "first record" in a relational db, i think.

Using MS SQL Server 2005, if you intend to delete the "top record" (the first one that is presented when you do a simple "*select * from tablename*"), you may use "delete top(1) from tablename"... but be aware that this does not assure which row is deleted from the recordset, as it just removes the first row that would be presented if you run the command "select top(1) from tablename".

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But which row would appear first could vary between running that select and running the subsequent delete. There are no guarantees on ordering without an order by clause. – Damien_The_Unbeliever Apr 9 '09 at 12:56
    
Yes, you're right. I think I underlined that in my post. The "top record" may vary. Thanks for your reply, as my English isn't the best and I may have not been clear in my reply. – XpiritO Apr 9 '09 at 13:16

Similar to the selected answer, a table source can be used, in this case a derived query:

delete from dd
from (
    select top 1 *
    from my_table
) dd

Feel free to add orderbys and conditions.

For the next example, I'll assume that the restriction on 'where' is due to not wanting to select a row based on its values. So assuming that we want to delete a row based on position (in this case the first position):

delete from dd
from (
    select
        *,
        row = row_number() over (order by (select 1))
    from my_table
) dd
where row = 1

Note that the (select 1) makes it the sort order that the tables or indexes are in. You can replace that with a newid to get fairly random rows.

You can also add a partition by to delete the top row of each color, for example.

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SQL-92:

DELETE Field FROM Table WHERE Field IN (SELECT TOP 1 Field FROM Table ORDER BY Field DESC)
share|improve this answer
    
TOP is not standard SQL-92. And I definitely see a where condition in your answer. – Martin Smith Sep 21 '14 at 20:32

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