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In C# how can I convert Unix-style timestamp to yyyy-MM-ddThh:mm:ssZ?

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Are you talking about a Unix-style timestamp? – jvenema Sep 7 '11 at 16:03
1  
Milliseconds relative to what ? A number of milliseconds would represent a timespan, not an exact date - unless you know you have N milliseconds since X specific date. – driis Sep 7 '11 at 16:04
    
No research - there are plenty of posts that answer this question already. – Chuck Savage Sep 7 '11 at 16:04
    
Number of milliseconds since when? – Paul Walls Sep 7 '11 at 16:04
up vote -4 down vote accepted

This question should have the answer you need.

Short version:

DateTime date = new DateTime(long.Parse(ticks));
date.ToString("yyyy-MM-ddThh:mm:ssZ");
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32  
I'm not sure why this was accepted, but ticks are NOT the same thing as milliseconds. You would need to multiply the millis by 10000 to get ticks for the DateTime constructor. – Yoten May 8 '12 at 19:31
    
I agree with Yoten. – Ben Bishop Sep 20 '13 at 13:15
1  
Probably even better to multiply by TimeSpan.TicksPerMillisecond (which equals to 10000) – infografnet Jan 6 '15 at 15:22

Start by converting your milliseconds to a TimeSpan:

var time = TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(milliseconds);

Now, in .NET 4 you can call .ToString() with a format string argument. See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.timespan.tostring.aspx

In previous versions of .NET, you'll have to manually construct the formatted string from the TimeSpan's properties.

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new DateTime(numTicks * 10000)

The DateTime(long ticks) constructor is what you need. Each tick represents 100 nanoseconds so multiply by 10000 to get to 1 millisecond.

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Thanks @Paul, confused micro- and nano-seconds. – Babak Naffas Sep 7 '11 at 16:48
    
Not a problem. :) – Paul Walls Sep 7 '11 at 16:57

If the milliseconds is based on UNIX epoch time, then you can use:

var posixTime = DateTime.SpecifyKind(new DateTime(1970, 1, 1), DateTimeKind.Utc);
var time = posixTime.AddMilliseconds(milliSecs);
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This answer works from JSON dates – Alan Macdonald Jan 27 '15 at 11:49
1  
or just var posixTime = new DateTime(1970, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, DateTimeKind.Utc); – Pal Mar 24 '15 at 11:52

This sample will demonstrate the general idea, but you need to know if your starting date is DateTime.MinValue or something else:

int ms = 1000;                          // One second
var date = new DateTime(ms * 10000);    // The constructor takes number of 100-nanoseconds ticks since DateTime.MinValue (midnight, january 1st, year 1)
string formatted = date.ToString("yyyy-MM-ddTHH:mm:ssZ");
Console.WriteLine(formatted);
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Here you go:

public static class UnixDateTime
    {
        public static DateTimeOffset FromUnixTimeSeconds(long seconds)
        {
            if (seconds < -62135596800L || seconds > 253402300799L)
                throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("seconds", seconds, "");

            return new DateTimeOffset(seconds * 10000000L + 621355968000000000L, TimeSpan.Zero);
        }

        public static DateTimeOffset FromUnixTimeMilliseconds(long milliseconds)
        {
            if (milliseconds < -62135596800000L || milliseconds > 253402300799999L)
                throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("milliseconds", milliseconds, "");

            return new DateTimeOffset(milliseconds * 10000L + 621355968000000000L, TimeSpan.Zero);
        }

        public static long ToUnixTimeSeconds(this DateTimeOffset utcDateTime)
        {
            return utcDateTime.Ticks / 10000000L - 62135596800L;
        }

        public static long ToUnixTimeMilliseconds(this DateTimeOffset utcDateTime)
        {
            return utcDateTime.Ticks / 10000L - 62135596800000L;
        }

        [Test]
        public void UnixSeconds()
        {
            DateTime utcNow = DateTime.UtcNow;
            DateTimeOffset utcNowOffset = new DateTimeOffset(utcNow);

            long unixTimestampInSeconds = utcNowOffset.ToUnixTimeSeconds();

            DateTimeOffset utcNowOffsetTest = UnixDateTime.FromUnixTimeSeconds(unixTimestampInSeconds);

            Assert.AreEqual(utcNowOffset.Year, utcNowOffsetTest.Year);
            Assert.AreEqual(utcNowOffset.Month, utcNowOffsetTest.Month);
            Assert.AreEqual(utcNowOffset.Date, utcNowOffsetTest.Date);
            Assert.AreEqual(utcNowOffset.Hour, utcNowOffsetTest.Hour);
            Assert.AreEqual(utcNowOffset.Minute, utcNowOffsetTest.Minute);
            Assert.AreEqual(utcNowOffset.Second, utcNowOffsetTest.Second);
        }

        [Test]
        public void UnixMilliseconds()
        {
            DateTime utcNow = DateTime.UtcNow;
            DateTimeOffset utcNowOffset = new DateTimeOffset(utcNow);

            long unixTimestampInMilliseconds = utcNowOffset.ToUnixTimeMilliseconds();

            DateTimeOffset utcNowOffsetTest = UnixDateTime.FromUnixTimeMilliseconds(unixTimestampInMilliseconds);

            Assert.AreEqual(utcNowOffset.Year, utcNowOffsetTest.Year);
            Assert.AreEqual(utcNowOffset.Month, utcNowOffsetTest.Month);
            Assert.AreEqual(utcNowOffset.Date, utcNowOffsetTest.Date);
            Assert.AreEqual(utcNowOffset.Hour, utcNowOffsetTest.Hour);
            Assert.AreEqual(utcNowOffset.Minute, utcNowOffsetTest.Minute);
            Assert.AreEqual(utcNowOffset.Second, utcNowOffsetTest.Second);
            Assert.AreEqual(utcNowOffset.Millisecond, utcNowOffsetTest.Millisecond);
        }
    }
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You can construct your datetime from ticks:

long ticks = new DateTime(1979, 07, 28, 22, 35, 5, 
  new CultureInfo("en-US", false).Calendar).Ticks;
DateTime dt3 = new DateTime(ticks);
Console.Write(dt3.ToString("yyyy-MM-ddThh:mm:ssZ"));
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