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Thanks to Perfection kills, we can use the following JavaScript to detect event support:

function hasEvent(ev) {
    var elem = document.createElement('a'),
        type = 'on' + ev,
        supported = elem[type] !== undefined;
    if (!supported) {
        elem.setAttribute(type, 'return;');
        supported = typeof elem[type] === 'function';
    }
    elem = null;
    return supported;
}

This works for about the only time I need it: detecting mouseenter support; hasEvent('mouseenter') will return false in Chrome, Firefox, etc., as it should.

But now I'm trying to "fix" browsers that don't support the focusin and focusout events. According to PPK, that's basically just Firefox. Unfortunately, Chrome and Safari are listed as having "incomplete" support, for the following reason:

Safari and Chrome fire these events only with addEventListener; not with traditional registration.

In general, that's fine; I'd only be using addEventListener anyway. It does mean, however, that detecting support via elem.onfocusin !== undefined won't work. I tested it out, and it's true:

<p>Do I support <a href="#">focusin</a>?</p>

<script>
var elem = document.getElementsByTagName('p')[0];

// hasEvent method defined here
function listener() {
    var response = hasEvent('focusin') ? 'Yes!' : 'No...';
    alert(response);
}

elem.addEventListener('focusin', listener, false);
</script>

The above alerts No... in Chrome!! Is there any way to detect whether the browser supports focusin, without using browser sniffing?

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is there a difference between mouseenter & mouseover? or focusin & focus? or focusout & blur? –  Ibu Sep 7 '11 at 17:09
1  
@Ibu mouseenter doesn't bubble, while mouseover does; focusin/focusout do bubble, focus/blur don't. –  sdleihssirhc Sep 7 '11 at 17:10
1  
Another important fact is that focusin and focusout event objects have the relatedTarget property which points to the element that has lost/received focus. –  Dmitry Pashkevich Feb 25 '13 at 11:51
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This uses the fact that calling focus() triggers focusin: http://jsfiddle.net/pimvdb/YXeD3/.

The element must be visible and inserted into the DOM, otherwise focusin is not fired for some reason.

var result = (function() {
    var hasIt = false;

    function swap() {
        hasIt = true; // when fired, set hasIt to true
    }

    var a = document.createElement('a'); // create test element
    a.href = "#"; // to make it focusable
    a.addEventListener('focusin', swap, false); // bind focusin

    document.body.appendChild(a); // append
    a.focus(); // focus
    document.body.removeChild(a); // remove again

    return hasIt; // should be true if focusin is fired
})();
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focusin & focusout should be fired BEFORE target element receives focus, event order is also seems buggy

http://www.w3.org/TR/DOM-Level-3-Events/#events-focusevent-event-order

currently, only IE works according to spec:

Chrome/Safari:
focus
focusin
DOMFocusIn
blur
focusout
DOMFocusOut
focus
focusin
DOMFocusIn

Opera 12:
focus
DOMFocusIn
focusin
blur
DOMFocusOut
focusout
focus
DOMFocusIn
focusin

IE 8:
focusin
focus
focusout
focusin
blur
focus

Firefox 14:
focus
blur
focus
share|improve this answer
    
Well, spec has been written following IE's behavior, so it's not really surprising. –  Louis-Rémi Jul 31 '12 at 9:02
1  
but IE behavior is good, ie support event.toElement/event.fromElement, other browsers doesn't support relativeTarget/toElement/fromElement for this event –  4esn0k Jul 31 '12 at 10:44
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