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I have class Foo<T> and an instance method Foo<T>.M with return type T and signature M(Bar bar). There is a constraint on T (T : AbstractBaseClass) so that I'm certain that T has a property T.SomeProperty (and a parameterless constructor constraint). Let's say that M has to set the value of T.SomeProperty based on bar as well on the concrete type of T. I do not want my code to look like

T t = new T();
if(typeof(T) == T1) {
     T.SomeProperty = // some function of bar
}
else if(typeof(T) == T2) {
     T.SomeProperty = // some function of bar
}
else if(typeof(T) == T3) {
     T.SomeProperty == // some function of bar
}

I do not want to put an instance method on T that takes in values from Bar to populate T.SomeProperty because that will make my Ts have a dependency on some things that I do not want it to them a dependency on.

What is my best option here?

Here's what I mean:

class AbstractBaseClass {
    public int SomeProperty { get; set; }
}

class Foo<T> where T : AbstractBaseClass, new() {
    public T M(Bar bar) {
        T t = new T();
        t.SomeProperty = // function of bar, typeof(T)
        return t;
    }
}

How to write M but avoid type-by-type logic on the type parameter T?

Edit:

What about this? This is riffing on Corey's idea:

interface ISomePropertyStrategy<T> {
    int GetSomeProperty(Bar bar);
}

class SomePropertyStrategyForConcreteClass1 :
    ISomePropertyStrategy<ConcreteClass1> {
    public int GetSomeProperty(Bar bar) { return bar.MagicValue + 73; }
}

class SomePropertyStrategyForConcreteClass2 :
    ISomePropertyStrategy<ConcreteClass2> {
    public int GetSomeProperty(Bar bar) { return bar.MagicValue - 12; }
}

class Foo<T> where T : AbstractBaseClass, new() {
    private readonly ISomePropertyStrategy<T> strategy;
    public Foo<T>(ISomePropertyStrategy<T> strategy) {
        this.stragety = strategy;
    }
    public T M(Bar bar) {
        T t = new T();
        t.SomeProperty = this.strategy.GetSomeProperty(bar);
        return t;
    }
 }

The only thing I don't like about this is that it uses a generic interface where the generic type parameter never appears in the interface. I think I once saw a comment from Eric Lippert where he said that wasn't a good idea, but I can't remember. Sorry.

share|improve this question
    
You could have a method in AbstractBaseClass, something like Apply(Bar b) that would set SomeProperty for you that can be overloaded, of course... Or accept a projection like Func<Bar, int>. –  James Michael Hare Sep 7 '11 at 17:37
    
@James Michael Hare: That makes AbstractBaseClass have a dependency on Bar which I don't want. –  enohPi Sep 7 '11 at 17:40
    
I see, then I'd go with the projection model in my comment, which is similar to Paul's answer below. –  James Michael Hare Sep 7 '11 at 17:41
    
You won't be able to cast up from a generic type, so you can't rely on a concrete method that is not defined in the base class. –  Paul Walls Sep 7 '11 at 17:53
1  
Well, why have an interface with a parameter that is used nowhere for no purpose? How does your program change if you simply remove the type parameter from ISomePropertyStrategy? –  Eric Lippert Sep 7 '11 at 21:31

3 Answers 3

So you have this:

class Foo<T>
    where T : AbstractBaseClass, new()
{
    T M( Bar bar )
    {
        T t = new T();

        if ( typeof (T) == T1 )
        {
            t.SomeProperty = bar.SomeMethod();
        }
        else if ( typeof (T) == T2 )
        {
            t.SomeProperty = bar.SomeOtherMethod();
        }
        else if ( typeof (T) == T3 )
        {
            t.SomeProperty == bar.YetAnotherMethod();
        }
    }
}

You could do this:

T M( Bar bar, Func<object> barFunction )
{
    T t = new T();

    t.SomeProperty = barFunction();
}

It doesn't require tight coupling with your Bar method. Here is some information on the Func<T> delegate.

share|improve this answer
    
Not quite. There isn't a method on Bar that produces the values depending on the type. Sorry for not being clear; I can see how you can got that from "// some function of bar" but that's not what I meant. –  enohPi Sep 7 '11 at 17:42
    
Okay, the downside to this is that if someone news up a Foo<T> and given a Bar named bar calls M, they now need to know what Func<object> to pass to M. So it now becomes possible for that logic to become duplicated, or even accidentally differ if it's called from two different places. –  enohPi Sep 7 '11 at 17:53

OK, here's a complete program. For the sake of the example, I take Bar to be some class that holds an interesting value (here, 100). I take foo.M to be a routine that wants to add 73 to the number inside Bar if the type argument is ConcreteClass1; it will want to subtract 12 from the number inside Bar if the type argument is ConcreteClass2.

The interface IABCVisitor and the virtual methods AcceptVisitor (one per class) may seem like a lot of overhead, but the nice thing is that you only have to pay that overhead once: once this pattern has been added to your class hiearchy you can reuse it over and over again, whenever your callers want to do custom logic based on type. I hope the program below makes sense to you.

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;

namespace ConsoleApplication33 {
  public class Program {
    public static void Main() {
      var foo1=new Foo<ConcreteClass1>();
      var foo2=new Foo<ConcreteClass2>();
      var bar=new Bar(100);

      var result1=foo1.M(bar);
      var result2=foo2.M(bar);
      Debug.Print("result1.SomeProperty="+result1.SomeProperty);
      Debug.Print("result2.SomeProperty="+result2.SomeProperty);
    }
  }

  //----------------------------------------------------------------------------
  // these definitions can appear in project 1
  // notice that project 1 does not have any dependencies on Bar
  //----------------------------------------------------------------------------

  /// <summary>
  /// This interface needs a line for each class in the hierarchy
  /// </summary>
  public interface IABCVisitor<out T> {
    T Visit(AbstractBaseClass x);
    T Visit(ConcreteClass1 x);
    T Visit(ConcreteClass2 x);
  }

  public abstract class AbstractBaseClass {
    public int SomeProperty { get; set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// All of AbstractBaseClasses' children need to override this property
    /// </summary>
    public virtual T AcceptVisitor<T>(IABCVisitor<T> visitor) {
      return visitor.Visit(this);
    }
  }

  public class ConcreteClass1 : AbstractBaseClass {
    public override T AcceptVisitor<T>(IABCVisitor<T> visitor) {
      return visitor.Visit(this);
    }
  }

  public class ConcreteClass2 : AbstractBaseClass {
    public override T AcceptVisitor<T>(IABCVisitor<T> visitor) {
      return visitor.Visit(this);
    }
  }

  //----------------------------------------------------------------------------
  // these definitions can appear in project 2
  //----------------------------------------------------------------------------

  public class Bar {
    public int MagicValue { get; private set; }

    public Bar(int magicValue) {
      MagicValue=magicValue;
    }
  }

  public class Foo<T> where T : AbstractBaseClass, new() {
    public T M(Bar bar) {
      T t=new T();
      t.SomeProperty=t.AcceptVisitor(new CalculateTheRightValue(bar));
      return t;
    }
  }

  public class CalculateTheRightValue : IABCVisitor<int> {
    private readonly Bar bar;

    public CalculateTheRightValue(Bar bar) {
      this.bar=bar;
    }

    public int Visit(AbstractBaseClass x) {
      throw new NotImplementedException("not implemented for type "+x.GetType().Name);
    }

    public int Visit(ConcreteClass1 x) {
      return bar.MagicValue+73;
    }

    public int Visit(ConcreteClass2 x) {
      return bar.MagicValue-12;
    }
share|improve this answer

This looks like a pretty classic application of the Visitor Pattern

share|improve this answer
    
Please explain, I don't follow. –  enohPi Sep 7 '11 at 17:33
    
Sure, I'll provide a code snippet shortly. –  Corey Kosak Sep 7 '11 at 17:37

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