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I have a piece of code that pretty much reduces down to:

template<class T> struct MyStruct;  // No definition by default
template<class T> struct MyStruct<T *> { ... };  // Specialization for pointers

Now somewhere in my code, I'm getting an instantiation of MyStruct<T> that happens to be undefined (no C++0x/011, no Boost... nothing fancy, just plain C++03):

error C2027: use of undefined type 'MyStruct<T>'

The trouble is, I have no idea where this is being caused, because the code that's doing the instantiation is itself a template, and called from numerous places, with different arguments.

Is there a way to somehow figure out what T is at compile-time, so I can understand the error messages better?

(Sorry, I forgot to mention: Visual Studio 2008.)

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3  
I believe you're using MSVC++, if so, then see the output window, it might have more info printed, especially the line number along with the filename. Once you know the file and line number, you can start from there. – Nawaz Sep 7 '11 at 17:31
    
what IDE and programming environment? – g19fanatic Sep 7 '11 at 17:31
    
What compiler are you using? – Jason Sep 7 '11 at 17:32
    
@g19fanatic, Jason: Sorry, included that. – Mehrdad Sep 7 '11 at 17:32
1  
@Nawaz: OH WOWWWW you're amazing... I can't believe I missed that! There are indeed lots of clarifications in the output window that don't appear in the error list!!! Thanks so much! Please post that as an answer or something! :) – Mehrdad Sep 7 '11 at 17:33
up vote 4 down vote accepted

I believe you're using MSVC++, if so, then see the output window, it might have more info printed, especially the line number along with the filename. Once you know the file and line number, you can start from there.

Output window usually prints everything, like how and with what template argument(s), a template is instantiated. Everything step by step. Those messages are very useful when debugging.

As you found yourself, enabling /WL prints more detail messages in the output window.

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1  
+1 Wow, I just happened to run across the /WL option as well -- seems like it was made to fix precisely this problem... – Mehrdad Sep 7 '11 at 17:38
    
@Mehrdad: Ohh yeah. I just forgot to mention that. – Nawaz Sep 7 '11 at 17:39

I know you said no C++11, but you may want to consider, since C++03 code is backwards compatible in all C++11 compliant compilers, to use the static_assert feature of C++11 to debug your code ... if you must do the final compile with a C++03 compiler, then you can always create a #define and use the #ifdef and #endif pre-processor macros to make sure that the static_assert feature does not cause problems in earlier compilers that do not support C++11 features.

See the MSDN docs here for more info.

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