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I'm familiar with Java JDBC and use it often to run simple SQLs. However, I want to run something like the below. This is more PL/SQL than regular SQL, hence my problems. I am not running this from the Oracle box but from my own computer. Can someone help me to run this kind of PL/SQL using Java?

spool C:\count.txt;
DEFINE date="TO_DATE ('08-29-2011','mm-dd-yyyy')";
SET NEWPAGE 0;
SET SPACE 0;
SET LINESIZE 500;
SET PAGESIZE 0;
SET ECHO OFF;
SET FEEDBACK OFF;
SET VERIFY OFF;
SET HEADING OFF;
SET TRIMSPOOL ON;
alter session set nls_date_format='yyyy-mm-dd hh24:mi';
select 'TABLE1', count(*) from SCHEMA.TABLE1 where modifyts < &date;
select 'TABLE2', count(*) from SCHEMA.TABLE2 where modifyts < &date;
select 'TABLE3', count(*) from SCHEMA.TABLE3 where modifyts < &date;
spool off;
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Hmm, are you asking how to run pl\sql from your Java Client. I am sorry I am having trouble understanding your question and especially your solution. If you are just trying to run PL\SQL, then you should create a function or procedure in your oracle database and use java to just call the routine. –  doc_180 Sep 7 '11 at 17:58
    
Did you already try plain Statement.execute(String)? For the SELECTs you'll probably have to use the getResultSet(), getUpdateCount(), getMoreResults() mentioned in that methods @SeeAlso. –  Philipp Reichart Sep 7 '11 at 18:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

SPOOL, DEFINE, and SET are all SQL*Plus commands. They are not valid in PL/SQL or in SQL. You cannot, therefore, run this sort of script through a tool other than SQL*Plus (or a tool that supports SQL*Plus commands like SQL Developer or Toad).

You could, of course, have your Java application call out to the operating system to invoke the SQL*Plus executable (assuming it is installed on the machine that the Java application is running on) and pass the script to SQL*Plus. But that's generally way more complexity than you need. It would make more sense to either just use SQL*Plus or to issue just the SELECT statements from your Java application and use Java's file I/O classes to write the results to a file.

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Thanks, this is what I should be doing. I didn't remember that most of those commands are SQL*Plus only. –  Matt Sep 7 '11 at 18:33

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