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The output of the below code is as following:

not equal
equal

Note the difference in type of x and xx and that == operator overload is only executed in the second case and not in the first.

Is there a way I can overload the == operator so that its always executed when a comparison is done on between MyDataObejct instances.

Edit 1:# here i want to override the == operator on MyDataClass , I am not sure how I can do it so that case1 also executes overloaded == implementation.

class Program {
    static void Main(string[] args) {
        // CASE 1
        Object x = new MyDataClass();
        Object y = new MyDataClass();
        if ( x == y ) {
            Console.WriteLine("equal");
        } else {
            Console.WriteLine("not equal");
        }

        // CASE 2 
        MyDataClass xx = new MyDataClass();
        MyDataClass yy = new MyDataClass();
        if (xx == yy) {
            Console.WriteLine("equal");
        } else {
            Console.WriteLine("not equal");
        }
    }
}

public class MyDataClass {
    private int x = 5;

    public static bool operator ==(MyDataClass a, MyDataClass b) {
        return a.x == b.x;
    }

    public static bool operator !=(MyDataClass a, MyDataClass b) {
        return !(a == b);
    }
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

No, basically. == uses static analysis, so will use the object ==. It sounds like you need to use object.Equals(x,y) instead (or x.Equals(y) if you know that neither is null), which uses polymorphism.

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1  
As a point of interest, what is the reasoning for not having operators be polymorphic? Seems to me that polymorphism would be more intuitive. –  Welbog Apr 9 '09 at 11:53
    
but which would win? in a == b, what method gets called? especially if a/b are different sub-types... –  Marc Gravell Apr 9 '09 at 11:59
1  
Also - polymorphism would make it harder to use nulls in operators. –  Marc Gravell Apr 9 '09 at 12:00
    
Is there something I can do to MyDataClass so that case1 can use do a custom logic ( data comparison not instance ) as defnied in == operator –  dotnetcoder Apr 9 '09 at 12:32
    
No. Not if the variables are typed as object. –  Marc Gravell Apr 9 '09 at 12:42

Here is a description on how to override Equals and the == operator:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173147(VS.80).aspx

This is how it looks (provided that you have already made an overload of Equals()):

public static bool operator ==(MyDataClass a, MyDataClass b)
{
    // If both are null, or both are same instance, return true.
    if (System.Object.ReferenceEquals(a, b))
    {
       return true;
    }

    // If one is null, but not both, return false.
    if (((object)a == null) || ((object)b == null))
    {
       return false;
    }

    // Otherwise use equals
    return a.Equals(b);
}

public override bool Equals(System.Object obj)
{
    // If parameter is null return false.
    if (obj == null)
    {
        return false;
    }

    // If parameter cannot be cast to MyDataClass return false.
    MyDataClass p = obj as MyDataClass;
    if ((System.Object)p == null)
    {
        return false;
    }

    return (x == p.x);
}
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Testing b for null in operator == is unnecessary: this is already done in Equals. You can just (implicitly) delegate the test. Also, why do you mix object.ReferenceEquals(x, y) with (object)x == (object)y? Stay consistent. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 9 '09 at 12:35

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