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At the moment I have some sort of asteroids game, which can been seen here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rQV6H9kWkFE

But at the moment when the user presses W when the ship is still moving, it will take the speed the ship is moving in regardless of its rotation and add to it, causing the ship to appear jerky and not coordinated (hard to explain, watch the video).

Here is the code I'm using:

public void update(int delta) throws SlickException
{
    float hip = speed * delta;

    float rotation = image.getRotation();

    for (Bullet b : bulletList)
    {
        b.update(delta);
    }

    Input input = gc.getInput();

    if (input.isKeyDown(Input.KEY_A))
    {
        image.rotate(rotateLeftSpeed * delta);

        if (rotateLeftSpeed > (ROTATE_LIMIT * -1))
        {
            rotateLeftSpeed -= rotateSpeed;
        }
    } else
    {
        if (rotateLeftSpeed < 0)
        {
            image.rotate(rotateLeftSpeed * delta);

            rotateLeftSpeed += rotateSpeed;

        }
    }

    if (input.isKeyDown(Input.KEY_D))
    {
        image.rotate(rotateRightSpeed * delta);
        if (rotateRightSpeed < (ROTATE_LIMIT))
        {
            rotateRightSpeed += rotateSpeed;
        }
    }

    else

    {
        if (rotateRightSpeed > 0)
        {
            image.rotate(rotateRightSpeed * delta);

            rotateRightSpeed -= rotateSpeed;

        }
    }

    if (input.isKeyDown(Input.KEY_W))
    {
        hip = speed * delta;
        protation = image.getRotation();
        rotation = image.getRotation();


        x += hip * Math.sin(Math.toRadians(rotation));
        y -= hip * Math.cos(Math.toRadians(rotation));
        if (speed < SPEED_LIMIT)
            speed += 0.005f;
    } else
    {
        if (speed > 0)
        {

            System.out.println(offSpeed);
            srotation = image.getRotation();
            hip = speed * delta;
            x += hip * Math.sin(Math.toRadians(protation));
            y -= hip * Math.cos(Math.toRadians(protation));
            speed -= 0.003f;

        }
    }

Is there anyway I can accomplish this without introducing a dx and dy values? With a minimum modification as possible?

share|improve this question
2  
The problem with Hungarian notation: I spent over a minute trying to figure out if "protation" was a gaming term or not... – corsiKa Sep 7 '11 at 18:43
1  
Its not Hungarian notation, it simply means Previous Rotation. – Derek Sep 7 '11 at 18:59
2  
You might want to rethink your rotateSpeed[Left or Right] and just keep one rotational speed. It might work as it is, but it looks odd. – toto2 Sep 7 '11 at 19:17
    
@Deza believe it or not, that is known as Apps Hungarian (the least offensive of the various flavors, it strives to use abbreviations to illustrate the logical purpose of variables). – corsiKa Sep 7 '11 at 19:57

The problem is obvious, even though you are facing a direction, it doesn't mean that you would move in that direction when you turn on your thrusters.

You need a second, internal direction vector that gets updated when your thrusters are on, most likely through a simple vector addition and a subsequent normalization. You then use that direction to calculate the direction you apply the force to the ship.

share|improve this answer
    
Umm, most rocket designs are such that you must travel in the direction you're facing. It's also the most intuitive for users. – corsiKa Sep 7 '11 at 18:44
    
And you downvoted me based on that assumption? I suggest dusting off a physics book and cracking it open sometime in the future... – Blindy Sep 7 '11 at 18:58
    
@glowcoder If you are in space without air resistance there is no reason to travel in the direction you are pointing to. On earth, airplane and rockets travel in the direction they are pointing to for obvious aerodynamic efficiency. – toto2 Sep 7 '11 at 19:03
    
@blindy I didn't downvote you. I only downvote when you're wrong on a technical front. I disagree with your design mechanic, but you're entirely spot on for your implementation! – corsiKa Sep 7 '11 at 19:50
1  
@glowcoder The force will be in the opposite direction from the nose, but the actual velocity can be in any direction. You can have a rocket that drifts sideways. In that case firing the thruster in a continuous manner would actually cause the rocket to go in a perfect circular trajectory with the nose of the rocket always pointing at the center of the circle. – toto2 Sep 7 '11 at 20:24
up vote 1 down vote accepted

In the end, I used this:

if (input.isKeyDown(Input.KEY_W))
    {

        dx += Math.sin(Math.toRadians(image.getRotation())) * delta * 0.01;
        dy += -Math.cos(Math.toRadians(image.getRotation())) * delta * 0.01;

    } 

    x += dx;
    y += dy;

    dx *= 0.98;
    dy *= 0.98;
share|improve this answer
    
Since you edited the code (+1), I deleted the earlier noise. – Andrew Thompson Sep 25 '11 at 8:01

Keep track of the player's motion in terms of a dx and dy, rather than a speed and angle, and add to those values when W is pressed.

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I think the problem is that you're adding the impulse from pressing W directly to the X,Y co-ordinates. What you need to do is have a velocity vector with X, Y co-ordinates, and add to that when the user thrusts.

The on each time step you add the x-velocity and y-velocity components to the X,Y co-ordinates.

The underlying physics is that you have position (x,y), velocity (dx/dt, dy/dt) and acceleration (dx^2/dt, dy^2/dt). Thrust provides an acceleration that you have to integrate over time to provide velocity, which is then integrated over time to give position.

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There are two "concepts" from physics which you need to implement: Speed and friction.

Here is a simple example in 2D. You may also use wrapper classes to combine the x/y variables into a single object and provide handy methods to alter their content.

Each object needs to have a position and a speed variable. We also need friction, which is a constant for each material (as your object probably always travels in the same material, we will just model friction to be constant). In this simple simulation, friction gets weaker, as the value approaches 1. That means at friction=1 you have no friction and at friction=0 your objects will stop immediately:

public class PhysicsObject{
    public static final double FRICTION = 0.99;
    private double posX;
    private double posY;
    private double speedX = 0;
    private double speedY = 0;
    public PhysicsObject(double posX, double posY){
        this.posX = posX;
        this.posY = posY;
    }
    public void accelerate(double accelerationX, double accelerationY){
        speedX += accelerationX;
        speedY += accelerationY;
    }
    public void update(){
        posX += speedX;
        posY += speedY;
        speedX *= FRICTION;
        speedY *= FRICTION;
    }
    public double getPosX(){
        return posX;
    }
    public double getPosY(){
        return posY;
    }
}

Notice that your object has an update method. this method needs to be called on all objects in your scene regularly, to apply the movement. In this method you could also process collision detection and enemies could do their AI logic..

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