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Here is some easy piece of code to show the unexpected behavior:

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        _UI = TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext();
        Loaded += new RoutedEventHandler(MainWindow_Loaded);
    }

    TaskScheduler _UI;

    void MainWindow_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {
            //Expected: Worker thread
            //Found: Worker thread
            DoSomething();
        })
        .ContinueWith(t =>
            {
                //Expected: Main thread
                //Found: Main thread
                DoSomething();

                Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
                {
                    //Expected: Worker thread
                    //Found: Main thread!!!
                    DoSomething();
                });
            }, _UI);
    }

    void DoSomething()
    {
        Debug.WriteLine(Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId.ToString());
    }
}

Why is the inner task executed in the main thread? How can i prevent this behavior?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Unfortunately, the Current task scheduler, when you're running your continuation, becomes the SynchronizationContextTaskScheduler setup by your TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext.

This is discussed in this Connect Bug - and was written this way by design in .NET 4. However, I agree that the behavior leaves a bit to be desired here.

You can work around this by grabbing a "background" scheduler in your constructor, and using it:

TaskScheduler _UI;

// Store the default scheduler up front
TaskScheduler _backgroundScheduler = TaskScheduler.Default; 

public MainWindow()
{
    InitializeComponent();

    _UI = TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext();
    Loaded += new RoutedEventHandler(MainWindow_Loaded);
}

Once you have that, you can easily schedule your "background" task appropriately:

void MainWindow_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
    {
        //Expected: Worker thread
        //Found: Worker thread
        DoSomething();
    })
    .ContinueWith(t =>
        {
            //Expected: Main thread
            //Found: Main thread
            DoSomething();

            // Use the _backgroundScheduler here
            Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
            {
                DoSomething();
            }, CancellationToken.None, TaskCreationOptions.None, _backgroundScheduler);

        }, _UI);
}

Also, in this case, since your operation is at the end, you could just put it in its own continuation and get the behavior you want. This, however, is not a "general purpose" solution, but works in this case:

void MainWindow_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
    {
        //Expected: Worker thread
        //Found: Worker thread
        DoSomething();
    })
    .ContinueWith(t =>
        {
            //Expected: Main thread
            //Found: Main thread
            DoSomething();

        }, _UI)
    .ContinueWith(t =>
            {
                //Expected: Worker thread
                //Found: Is now worker thread
                DoSomething();
            });
}
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Ah cool, that helped me a lot. Thank you very much. –  Daniel Jant Sep 7 '11 at 20:37

If you want to ensure that your inner task is not run on the UI thread, simply mark it as LongRunning:

Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
            {
                //Expected: Worker thread
                //Found: Main thread!!!
                DoSomething();
            }, TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning);

That should ensure it is given its own thread instead of inlining on the current thread.

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No sry, this doesnt work. Still executed in main thread. –  Daniel Jant Sep 7 '11 at 18:51
    
Have you tried simply not running the continuation on the UI thread and simply dispatching events to the UI thread? Trying to specify the TaskScheduler when you just need to throw some method on the UI thread queue seems inefficient. –  Tejs Sep 7 '11 at 18:52
    
I have a solution - but i dont like it. I can do a SynchronizationContext.Current.Post() before executing the inner task. But the point is - I expect from a call to Task.Factory.StartNew() to be independend of the fact if i call them from an outer task or not. I implemented a lot of methods with .StartNew() and atm these methods behave different if called or not from inside another task. –  Daniel Jant Sep 7 '11 at 18:59
    
@Daniel: Unfortunately, StartNew() uses the current TaskScheduler in the TaskFactory, which isn't independent of whether you're in a task. I understand why they did it this way (for computation), but it's awful when working with UIs. –  Reed Copsey Sep 7 '11 at 19:32
    
Is it possible to explicitly create a new TaskScheduler? Some way to force TPL to execute a task not in the ui thread? –  Daniel Jant Sep 7 '11 at 20:14

Apart from @reed-copsey`s great answer I want to add that if you want to force your task to be executed on a threadpool thread you can also use the TaskScheduler.Default property which always refers to the ThreadPoolTaskScheduler:

return Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
{
   Console.WriteLine(Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId.ToString());
}, CancellationToken.None, TaskCreationOptions.None, TaskScheduler.Default);

This way you dont have to capture the task scheduler in a variable like proposed in @reed-copsey `s answer.

More information on TaskSchedulers can be found here: TaskSchedulers on MSDN

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