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I have two arrays of 2-by-2 complex matrices, and I was wondering what would be the fastest method of multiplying them. (I want to do matrix multiplication on the elements of the matrix arrays.) At present, I have

numpy.array(map(lambda i: numpy.dot(m1[i], m2[i]), range(l)))

But can one do better than this?

Thanks,

v923z

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3 Answers 3

If m1 and m2 are 1-dimensional arrays of 2x2 complex matrices, then they essentially have shape (l,2,2). So matrix multiplication on the last two axes is equivalent to summing the product of the last axis of m1 with the second-to-last axis of m2. That's exactly what np.dot does:

np.dot(m1,m2)

Or, since you have complex matrices, perhaps you want to take the complex conjugate of m1 first. In that case, use np.vdot.

PS. If m1 is a list of 2x2 complex matrices, then perhaps see if you can rearrange your code to make m1 an array of shape (l,2,2) from the outset.

If that is not possible, a list comprehension

[np.dot(m1[i],m2[i]) for i in range(l)]

will be faster than using map with lambda, but performing l np.dots is going to be slower than doing one np.dot on two arrays of shape (l,2,2) as suggested above.

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If m1 and m2 are 1-dimensional arrays of 2x2 complex matrices, then they essentially have shape (l,2,2). So matrix multiplication on the last two axes is equivalent to summing the product of the last axis of m1 with the second-to-last axis of m2. That's exactly what np.dot does:

But that is not what np.dot does.

 a = numpy.array([numpy.diag([1, 2]), numpy.diag([2, 3]), numpy.diag([3, 4])])

produces a (3,2,2) array of 2-by-2 matrices. However, numpy.dot(a,a) creates 6 matrices, and the result's shape is (3, 2, 3, 2). That is not what I need. What I need is an array holding numpy.dot(a[0],a[0]), numpy.dot(a[1],a[1]), numpy.dot(a[2],a[2]) ...

[np.dot(m1[i],m2[i]) for i in range(l)]

should work, but I haven't yet checked, whether it is faster that the mapping of the lambda expression.

Cheers,

v923z

EDIT: the for loop and the map runs at about the same speed. It is the casting to numpy.array that consumes a lot of time, but that would have to be done for both methods, so there is no gain here.

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I think the answer you are looking for is here. Unfortunately it is a rather messy solution involving reshaping.

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