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In R I can type

> alist<-c(1:10)
> alist
 [1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10

How do I make a list that goes up by increments that is not 1? For example a list of even numbers

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4  
I'll bet you can spot the answer to your question pretty quickly by scanning the first few dozen entries of a manual. (Hint: 2.3) –  joran Sep 7 '11 at 21:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 14 down vote accepted

You need the seq command. Executing seq(1,10,1) does what 1:10 does. However, you can change the last parameter to be something else so it can take steps of whatever size you like.

> #a vector of even numbers
> seq(0, 10, 2)
> [1]  0  2  4  6  8 10

As an aside, what you are making is a vector, not a list. A list can contain lots of completely different kinds of information whereas vectors contain the same information in every position of the index.

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+1 As a further aside, and just to confuse things, a list is in fact a vector. Try is.vector(as.list(1:5)) and you will see the result is TRUE. –  Andrie Sep 7 '11 at 21:38
    
so he's making a vector either way ... :) –  John Sep 7 '11 at 23:02
1  
I think adding the "by=2" helps for readability for seq(0, 10, by=2). –  Travis Nelson Sep 8 '11 at 5:11
    
You're right. On the other hand, I'm really hoping they look it up in help and giving too much away in the answer makes that less likely to happen. –  John Sep 8 '11 at 15:42

To my surprise, @Travis's solution is considerably (4x) faster. Unless you are doing something really huge (and the sequence-generation turns out to be the limiting factor), I would still vote for seq as being much easier to read.

edit: as Marek points out, seq.int is even faster.

> library(rbenchmark) # Note spelling: "rbenchmark", not "benchmark"
> benchmark(seq(0,1e6,by=2),(0:5e5)*2,seq.int(0L,1e6L,by=2L))
                         test replications elapsed  relative user.self sys.self
2               (0:5e+05) * 2          100   0.587  3.536145     0.344    0.244
1       seq(0, 1e+06, by = 2)          100   2.760 16.626506     1.832    0.900
3 seq.int(0, 1000000, by = 2)          100   0.166  1.000000     0.056    0.096
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If you need fast solution then seq.int(0L, 1e6L, by=2L) –  Marek Sep 8 '11 at 9:36

Since R uses matrices, you can use scalar multiplication to modify each element in your array.

> r <-c(0:10) 
> r <- r * 2
> r 
 [1]  0  2  4  6  8 10 12 14 16 18 20

or

> r <-c(0:10)*2 
> r 
 [1]  0  2  4  6  8 10 12 14 16 18 20
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I think especially with R and with newbies that it is important not to throw around the words "array", "list" and "matrix" unless you are really talking about one of those data types. The object you created is a vector. It is not a matrix or an array. –  adamleerich Sep 7 '11 at 22:33
    
True, I slipped and called the vector an array. My bad –  Travis Nelson Sep 8 '11 at 5:10

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